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Matt H.
02-03-2017, 12:07 PM
We've all been pretty jaded to on-screen violence and cruelty for years, but when you were a young viewer - and naive as to just how dark films can get - which scenes scarred you, either because of the level of violence or because of a mean and/or cruel tone.

THE TOXIC AVENGER - I saw this after Part II (around 11 years old) and was not at all prepared. The scene where the kid gets run over by the villains haunted me for at least a year. Watching the film many times since, I realized the brilliance of this scene: it happens around the 8 minute mark and it's so vicious that it keeps you on the edge of your seat the entire film - wondering what could possibly be coming next. Also, the music playing in the background during the scene is the happiest, most upbeat pop song imaginable and makes it that much more disturbing. No scene before or since has upset me as much as this one.

ROBOCOP 2 - There's something off about this movie and I was aware of it even as a kid - it's one of the most mean-spirited Hollywood films ever released. The scene that really shocked me is when the Little Leaguers rob the electronic's store with their coach, especially when you see two of them torturing the elderly owner by smacking him on the knee with an aluminum baseball bat (one kid is hitting him and the other kid is saying: "Harder!").

STONE COLD - This was another one that seemed off at the time, in regards to its level of violence and cruelty. The opening montage of the biker shooting the priest, followed by him blowing up the judge who convicted him was really scary, but the scene that haunted me is when Chains and the other bikers abduct the National Guardsmen, put them in wood crates and shoot them to death in cold blood.

What are some of your traumatizing movie memories?

Mark Tolch
02-03-2017, 12:14 PM
That's interesting...I don't remember being upset by violence in movies when I was younger, I'm far more susceptible to it now...I'd say that there were some scenes of cruelty, such as Frank Booth's treatment of Dorothy in BLUE VELVET, that left an impression, but I don't remember being upset by that, either.

Alison Jane
02-03-2017, 12:18 PM
This is an interesting idea for a thread. I am really bad at remembering this kind of thing though! Will post when I think of something!

Alison Jane
02-03-2017, 12:20 PM
Oh... wait...

17357

:haha:

Alex K.
02-03-2017, 12:34 PM
Horror films never affected me on that level until Last House on the Left. And even then I just pushed through it and got desensitized.

Non-horror would be Martin Scorsese's Casino and that scene where Pesci and his brother are beaten to death with baseball bats. It didn't really upset me when I saw it at the age of 13 or so but it made me take pause.

agent999
02-03-2017, 12:45 PM
I saw Death Wish when I was 10. The rape scene was pretty shocking, I thought naked women were supposed to be fun.

Alison Jane
02-03-2017, 12:50 PM
The rape scene was pretty shocking, I thought naked women were supposed to be fun.

Some don't realize that right away, I guess.

Matt H.
02-03-2017, 01:35 PM
Non-horror would be Martin Scorsese's Casino and that scene where Pesci and his brother are beaten to death with baseball bats. It didn't really upset me when I saw it at the age of 13 or so but it made me take pause.

Good one. That scene was fucking crazy on the big screen!

Jason C
02-03-2017, 03:40 PM
Robocop - Murphy's exploding hand was shocking enough but the mocking was even more unsettling. "Does it hurt? *cackle*"

Quot
02-03-2017, 04:03 PM
I was 8 yrs old, attending a harmless (ie, family-friendly) feature in an old theater in a small town in Georgia, circa 1963-64...and they showed the trailer to H.G. Lewis' Two Thousand Maniacs.

Talk about warping a fragile little mind!

Actually, the ones that really upset/disturbed me the most was when I was much older: The tendon slicing in Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance and the unexpected suicide in Cache.

Tom Clark
02-03-2017, 07:02 PM
Another vote here for Murphy's death in RoboCop and Pesci's in Casino. Both are still savage.

Matt H.
02-03-2017, 08:07 PM
I was 8 yrs old, attending a harmless (ie, family-friendly) feature in an old theater in a small town in Georgia, circa 1963-64...and they showed the trailer to H.G. Lewis' Two Thousand Maniacs.

I got freaked out by TWO THOUSAND MANIACS! by the clips I saw in the TERROR ON TAPE compilation - I think what makes it chilling to an impressionable mind is the fact that the torture is being done by a group of regular-looking people who laugh their heads off the entire time.

JLG
02-03-2017, 08:11 PM
i did not like the throat cut scene in Die Hard 2.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuSsSwg9MXs
this is the one that upset me the most tho. upset might not be the right word. this shit terrified me. funny now

Matt H.
02-03-2017, 08:20 PM
Haha, yes, SUPERMAN III... probably the scariest thing I had ever seen up to that point! I remember my parents would make me close my eyes when that scene was about to come on.

I dunno, man... it still kinda scares me.

Quot
02-03-2017, 09:12 PM
Actually, and this may sound silly to most, but as a youth, a very cruel scene that really made an impression on these eyes was the donkey transformation scene in Pinocchio. Holy Jeebus!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgmfV5VLHvs

Mark Tolch
02-03-2017, 09:16 PM
Actually, and this may sound silly to most, but as a youth, a very cruel scene that really made an impression on these eyes was the donkey transformation scene in Pinocchio. Holy Jeebus!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgmfV5VLHvs


That one was pretty terrifying!

Headless Body
02-03-2017, 10:20 PM
Last House on the Left

This is the right answer. Though I can't say I've ever become desensitized to it. It's the opposite for me. That film becomes more painful with each viewing.

Matt H.
02-03-2017, 10:44 PM
Actually, the ones that really upset/disturbed me the most was when I was much older: The tendon slicing in Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance and the unexpected suicide in Cache.

A couple of more recent ones that come immediately to mind are the live dismemberment in GREEN INFERNO and the face smashing in PAN'S LABYRINTH.

I think the most punishing experience of my adult life has to be seeing A SERBIAN FILM on the big screen, in a packed theater. I thought I was going to have a heart attack during the final 15 minutes!

Takuma
02-03-2017, 11:00 PM
The elevator scene in Basic Instinct. Also the closing scene (although there's no violence in it). I was probably 11 or 12 when I saw it (secretly on TV)

Toyboy
02-03-2017, 11:38 PM
Oh... wait...

17357

:haha:

Is that how Ian wakes you up in the morning?

Toyboy
02-03-2017, 11:49 PM
I saw Death Wish when I was 10. The rape scene was pretty shocking, I thought naked women were supposed to be fun.

I saw part 2 at the drive-in with my parents. Not a good movie for a 9-year-old.

I have a few, the enema scene in the TV movie SYBIL being the most traumatic.

The cat vivisection in THE SAILOR WHO FELL FROM GRACE WITH THE SEA. Again, saw this with my parents as a child.

There was one movie I saw on TV that I don't know the title of but it had a scene where a bunch of kids are standing in circle throwing rocks at a bird, killing it.

Ignatius
02-04-2017, 12:30 AM
Robocop 2 got me as well when I was young - specifically the scene where the crooked cop has his torso sliced open with a scalpel. It had the equivalent of a PG-13 rating in NZ so I must have been only about 10 or 11 when I saw it. I recall looking at the video case and wondering why it had an R18 rating in Australia. I found out pretty quickly.

I also recall watching Under Siege 2 at a similar age and being disturbed by Eric Bogosian's fingertips being sliced off at the end.

sukebanboy
02-04-2017, 01:25 AM
THREADS and THE DAY AFTER were pretty rough..and they were on tv!!

WHEN THE WIND BLOWS was very upsetting....as was the violence in WATERSHIP DOWN.....

Also, back when theaters showed shorts before the feature (UK) there was one about a hitchhiker killing people..and it was an old woman..cant remember it much now...but thought it was too much to be showing before a Disney movie!!

Horror stuff never really got to me as I could internalise the violence and stuff as make believe from an early age...the ones mentioned above were too realistic!!!

Randy G
02-04-2017, 02:22 AM
The ending of THREADS for sure. I saw THE SHINING when I was 7 or 8 and the woman in the bathtub and the twins freaked me out. The murder of Peter Weller in ROBOCOP that others have mentioned, the sadism was unusual for an action film.

Dom D
02-04-2017, 03:07 AM
I remember as a kid being pretty shaken up by the dog stuff in The Fly 2. Fortunately though it hasn't really stuck with me what the content was there...

I remember the first time I watched Pulp Fiction the scene where Travolta and Jackson shoot up the kids over breakfast had an impact. Oddly I watch that scene now and can't even really see why it bothered me. Much more likely to be laughing than feeling shocked now.

Poletergeist 3. Just because of all the mirror stuff. Growing up I was often living in towers like that with the shiny stainless steel lifts and the mirrors everywhere. Was always looking for Kane out of the corner of my eye.

Lots of Dr Who stuff scarred me greatly. Kids now must be really getting shaken up by it as these days it is actually genuinely frightening.

agent999
02-04-2017, 03:26 AM
Not violent or cruel, but the music at the end of Close Encounters when the mothership is communicating scared me shitless as a kid. All those bowel shaking low notes freaked me out, I had to block my ears when I watched it.

Also, add me to the list as being freaked out by that Superman III robot transformation.

Nabonga
02-04-2017, 03:33 AM
City Of The Living Dead's head drill messed me up at the time. I was a complete horror movie virgin and couldn't believe what I was seeing. Today it's one of my all time favorite films (and scenes... ahem).

Also the Pesci death in Casino. Just thinking about that scene gives me anxiety. I know, he was a complete scumbag but nobody deserves that, haha. In general more realistic film violence disturbs me tremendously. I can laugh my ass off at Bloodsucking Freaks because it's sooo over the top and bizarre but a scene like Ethan Hawke's encounter with the gang bangers in Training Day still gives me nightmares.

Alison Jane
02-04-2017, 07:33 AM
This is the right answer. Though I can't say I've ever become desensitized to it. It's the opposite for me. That film becomes more painful with each viewing.

Awww, you guys are no fun. :haha:

JLG
02-04-2017, 08:20 AM
but a scene like Ethan Hawke's encounter with the gang bangers in Training Day still gives me nightmares.

good call. think i was 19 when that came out. that scene is a good one. all fun and games then it takes a sharp turn.

i had a moment when i realized that i was in a possibly not good place with people i did not know. nothing happened cuz i got up, got out, and just started running. lost a shoe. i've told a few people about this but i compare it to that scene from Training Day. major slap in the face/wake up call from the tension

george n
02-04-2017, 08:48 AM
As a young teenager the animal violence in cannibal holocaust was pretty upsetting...more recently would be the french martyrs....i have seen far worse violence bit the whole film was so depressing it effected my mood for days.

another that springs to mind was when 'it' premiered on uk tv, I begged my parents to let me stay up and watch it. The first scene with georgey and I was running up the stairs.

its funny that people mention casino...I watched it for the first time a few months ago and found the baseball bat scene distressing

Headless Body
02-04-2017, 10:27 AM
Awww, you guys are no fun. :haha:

LOL, I'm tons of fun. I'll have you know I actually typed all of that while wearing a LHOTL shirt. Still am, actually. :cool:

Alison Jane
02-04-2017, 10:51 AM
Animal cruelty always bothered me. I remember when I was a kid there was a Disney movie, back when Disney movies weren't all G-rated, called The Thanksgiving Promise. It was part of the Disney Sunday Night Movie television series in the 80s. It was about a boy who's paid to raise a turkey that will inevitably be cooked for Thanksgiving dinner. They form a bond, blah blah blah. There is one scene where older bullies in the town are picking on him and start to beat him up. The turkey goes after them. One of them ends up hitting it with a bat. According to my mom, I was in tears for the rest of the night. Good job, Disney!

sukebanboy
02-04-2017, 12:17 PM
Animal cruelty always bothered me. I remember when I was a kid there was a Disney movie, back when Disney movies weren't all G-rated, called The Thanksgiving Promise. It was part of the Disney Sunday Night Movie television series in the 80s. It was about a boy who's paid to raise a turkey that will inevitably be cooked for Thanksgiving dinner. They form a bond, blah blah blah. There is one scene where older bullies in the town are picking on him and start to beat him up. The turkey goes after them. One of them ends up hitting it with a bat. According to my mom, I was in tears for the rest of the night. Good job, Disney!

Haha...it was KES that did this to me....

The Silly Swede
02-04-2017, 06:22 PM
Violence and scares never really bothered me. Somehow I always knew that it wasn't real. However, scenes when people are put in embarrasing situations affected me greatly, and still do occasionally.

Very strange indeed.

Paul L
02-04-2017, 06:57 PM
THREADS and THE DAY AFTER were pretty rough..and they were on tv!!

WHEN THE WIND BLOWS was very upsetting....as was the violence in WATERSHIP DOWN.....

Horror stuff never really got to me as I could internalise the violence and stuff as make believe from an early age...the ones mentioned above were too realistic!!!
Those would be on my list too, as well as THE PLAGUE DOGS. WHEN THE WIND BLOWS was particularly upsetting, I think.

THREADS, in particular, haunted me for years afterwards. I watched it with my parents on its first transmission, and then we watched it a few years later at school.

I never found fictional violence particularly disturbing: I remember watching NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET and Fulci's zombie films on VHS at the age of about seven or eight and wasn't too disturbed by the violence in those. On the other hand, I remember watching the heavily edited UK VHS release of NIGHTS OF TERROR/BURIAL GROUND at a similar age and finding that one deeply unsettling; I can't articulate why I found that disturbing but the Fulci films weren't, other than to suggest that there was something very scuzzy and grubby about NIGHTS OF TERROR: where the Fulci films felt like they had been made by a 'proper' filmmaker and therefore I knew that what I was seeing was the product of fantasy (and they began an early fascination with the notion of special effects which would culminate in me making a fake severed hand using a rubber glove and plaster of Paris), NIGHTS OF TERROR/BURIAL GROUND haunted me because of its amateurism - it seemed like a pervy, dirty and violent home movie.

Somewhere between the age of 10 and 12, BEYOND THE DARKNESS and DON'T GO IN THE HOUSE also disturbed me as a child; the former particularly so, as I remember watching the film and reading the oft-repeated rumour that D'Amato had used real corpses for one of the SFX scenes. The intimation that some of the grue in that film was 'real' tipped me over the edge and I dumped the VHS tape I had acquired of that film (the AVI release) at a second hand shop, frightened of the prospect of owning something with very 'real' violence in it. In retrospect, I wish I'd kept that tape; but hindsight is a wonderful thing. LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT, which I watched about the same time via a bootleg copy of the banned British VHS tape, also disturbed me for the sense of realism in its photography.

The FACES OF DEATH films were also an illicit delight at that age, watched on bootleg VHS tapes shared amongst my friends at school; I was fascinated with these even though they disturbed me, and of course we all believed everything we were seeing in those films was utterly true.

I had an English teacher who showed us footage from the liberation of one of the concentration camps, and the images from that are imprinted on my brain.

I was 14 when GHOSTWATCH was aired on television and that traumatised me - again, not violent by any stretch of the imagination, but as with BURIAL GROUND it was the sense of realism within the aesthetic that haunted me.

I think that's the thing that I found disturbing as a child: not graphic images per se, as in the context of most films I had an implicit understanding that these were works of fiction, but rather films that felt, for whatever reason, 'real' - THREADS, GHOSTWATCH, NIGHTS OF TERROR/BURIAL GROUND. On the other hand, things which were real haunted me too (the concentration camp footage).

47lab
02-04-2017, 09:33 PM
I can't recall any "violent or cruel" scenes bothering me as a youngster but I do vividly remember the Father Karras' dream sequence from the EXORCIST gave me the heebie jeebies. I think it's the quick cut of Captain Howdy that scared me shitless as a kid. :shock:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koXMhFXSF9A

Not sure if this qualifies as a "cruel scene" but the bestiality porno shoot in Miike's DOA unsettled me since I was watching it with my family and it was extremely awkward. :funny: VISITOR Q is perhaps his most extreme movie in terms of sexual hijinks but just the casual way that fluffer was jacking off his dog to get it ready to mount that porno actress "doggie style" was surreal. :wtf:

enandalusiskhund
02-05-2017, 06:38 AM
Casino was actually the last film cut by the censors for theatrical exhibition here in Sweden. Scorsese was furious and insisted it showed with some written "words from the director" before the film began, where he told the audience how sad it was they didn't get to see the complete film. Just a bit of trivia.

The tv series version of It, as somebody else also mentioned, was very scary for me as a kid. But the big one was The Temple of Doom, the second Indy film, which I saw when I was way too young. It was traumatizing. Such a dark and brutal matine adventure. I remember the scenes where Indiana Jones got a poison that made him evil, was one of the most horrifying segments of the film, probably because Indy was the safe and reliable adult character in the film.

Matt H.
02-05-2017, 01:07 PM
On the other hand, I remember watching the heavily edited UK VHS release of NIGHTS OF TERROR/BURIAL GROUND at a similar age and finding that one deeply unsettling; I can't articulate why I found that disturbing but the Fulci films weren't, other than to suggest that there was something very scuzzy and grubby about NIGHTS OF TERROR: where the Fulci films felt like they had been made by a 'proper' filmmaker and therefore I knew that what I was seeing was the product of fantasy (and they began an early fascination with the notion of special effects which would culminate in me making a fake severed hand using a rubber glove and plaster of Paris), NIGHTS OF TERROR/BURIAL GROUND haunted me because of its amateurism - it seemed like a pervy, dirty and violent home movie.

I wonder if the eerie electronic score had something to do with it; it really gives the film an otherworldly quality, and perhaps that's part of what made it unsettling to you as a young boy. More and more I'm finding when I revisit films that scared me as a youngster, alot of them happen to have really creepy and/or intense music scores. A great example would be CREEPSHOW: I wasn't exactly sure why I had always considered this one of the scariest films I saw in my youth, but I'm positive that John Harrison's bone-chilling score was a huge part of it. Back when we were kids, movies were a purely visceral experience - we really did watch them without the knowledge and awareness that we bring to a movie now as veteran viewers - and something like an effective music score could (and probably did) make certain films even better than we probably even realized at the time.

Matt H.
02-05-2017, 01:24 PM
But the big one was The Temple of Doom, the second Indy film, which I saw when I was way too young. It was traumatizing. Such a dark and brutal matine adventure. I remember the scenes where Indiana Jones got a poison that made him evil, was one of the most horrifying segments of the film, probably because Indy was the safe and reliable adult character in the film.

That was a huge one for me, too. My friend and I were talking about this topic, and he suggested that, more often than not, the scenes that traumatized us as kids were the ones where authority figures are threatened: parents, police, the hero etc.. It's frightening for kids to see adults being harmed or beaten by the bad guys, and - especially - seeing evil prevail. I think that idea makes sense when you see how many people here were traumatized by Murphy's death in ROBOCOP; it's one of the most brutal examples of shattering a viewer's sense of safety - particularly young viewers, who by this point in their life were likely more used to the formula films that played by the established Hollywood "rules" - where everything is black and white, and someone always swoops in to save the hero.

Tom Clark
02-05-2017, 08:19 PM
Casino was actually the last film cut by the censors for theatrical exhibition here in Sweden. Scorsese was furious and insisted it showed with some written "words from the director" before the film began, where he told the audience how sad it was they didn't get to see the complete film. Just a bit of trivia.
It actually got an NC-17 for violence here in the States before Scorsese successfully appealed it. When I found that out it surprised the hell out of me what with it being a major studio film. Violent as it is, normally a film that big would skirt by with an R no problem. Man, now I wanna watch it again. Fucking amazing movie.

Takuma
02-06-2017, 12:27 AM
That was a huge one for me, too. My friend and I were talking about this topic, and he suggested that, more often than not, the scenes that traumatized us as kids were the ones where authority figures are threatened: parents, police, the hero etc.. It's frightening for kids to see adults being harmed or beaten by the bad guys, and - especially - seeing evil prevail. I think that idea makes sense when you see how many people here were traumatized by Murphy's death in ROBOCOP; it's one of the most brutal examples of shattering a viewer's sense of safety - particularly young viewers, who by this point in their life were likely more used to the formula films that played by the established Hollywood "rules" - where everything is black and white, and someone always swoops in to save the hero.

That reminded me... one film that shocked me as a kid was On Her Majesty's Secret Service. [Spoilers ahead] The bad guys who kill Bond's wife get away. I was prefectly fine with a dead wife, but bad guys getting away... I couldn't believe it. My dad kept telling me they'll be caught in some later movie, but... You can't end a movie like that, dammit! :haha:

Paul L
02-06-2017, 03:37 AM
I wonder if the eerie electronic score had something to do with it; it really gives the film an otherworldly quality, and perhaps that's part of what made it unsettling to you as a young boy.
Good point, Matt. The music probably did help give the film something of its nightmarish texture. It's still a film that I love even today. (That old UK VHS release from Apex was missing over 20 minutes of footage, as I recall, including pretty much all of the gore - so it wasn't the violence within the picture that disturbed me. Then again, thinking back to my childhood, I often found the suggestion of violence more disturbing than the actual depiction of violence.)

There's a scene in KINGDOM OF THE SPIDERS in which someone is found in a giant cocoon within a vehicle. I've not seen that film in maybe 30 years, but it sticks in my memory vividly. Also, the scene in HALLOWEEN III in which the woman is experimenting with the Silver Shamrock badge, causing it to 'misfire' and a giant insect to crawl out of her mouth, haunted me - as did the scene in which the family is locked in a room at the Silver Shamrock factory and the advertisement is played, causing the masks the children are wearing to trigger and those godawful giant centipedes, snakes and cockroaches, etc, to crawl out of their corpses. That scene traumatised me, and I still find it hard to watch - maybe for different reasons, these days, but it's disturbing nonetheless. I don't know how I could have omitted either of those scenes from my previous post.

Mark C.
02-06-2017, 03:51 AM
The worst thing I ever saw that stuck with me for years and years afterwards, and in fact changed the way I chew and swallow food for many years afterwards as well, was a classroom scare film on choking hazards and a demonstration of how to save a person who was choking. This was in 1985 and the 16mm movie they played for us was made in the 70's (I should track it down one of these days), anyway there was one scene of a guy choking and turning all green, it was horrifying, pure horror show. The people in the film try and save him but no one knew how. It stuck with me as a horrible way to die.

Lorne Marshall
02-10-2017, 09:44 PM
Many have mentioned LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT, but I'm surprised no one offered I SPIT ON YOUR GRAVE. When I saw the latter upon its release (on a drive-in double bill with Fulci's ZOMBIE), it immediately disturbed me.

I didn't see it again until probably 20 years later, when someone I knew was throwing away VHS tapes of movies they had upgraded to DVD and gave me his copy. I tried to watch it, but when the second rape scene occurred, I had to stop the tape. And I knew that there was more to come.

Now, I'm not going to say that I have any explanation that would be objective. I also reacted negatively to LAST HOUSE when I first saw it, but eventually came to be able to endure it, and even appreciate it.

Two reasons I put I SPIT on a different level are intertwined: The rape scenes are extremely realistic (i.e., effective), but I feel they far outweigh her eventual revenge. By contrast, the remake had the right balance, I thought. Yes, I know, it's a purely subjective viewpoint.

On a lighter note, when I was much younger (only 10 years old), I went to another drive-in double-feature with my older sisters. If my memory serves me right, they had something called "Silver Dollar Night" that showing, in which they issued every car a silver dollar and allowed you to keep it unless you left the drive-in early. (As I said, my memory is probably a bit rough on this one, especially because I can't imagine how they would enforce such a thing.)

Anyway, the titles were THEATER OF BLOOD and TWITCH OF THE DEATH NERVE. They were both great and to this day are among my very favorite horror movies, but at the time, they terrified me.

The Vincent Price film came on first, and the opening Julius Caesar themed murder was likely my very first experience with uncensored cinematic violence. It was shocking...and it now has a special place in my heart, as you can imagine (although I suppose it would be more appropriate to use that praise for the Merchant of Venice scene :biggrin:).

Alex K.
02-10-2017, 11:38 PM
I watched I Spit about a year or two after LHOTL. It's easily a better film than LHOTL.

Lorne Marshall
02-11-2017, 12:27 AM
I watched I Spit about a year or two after LHOTL. It's easily a better film than LHOTL.

You're probably objectively right, Alex, as LAST HOUSE tends to be a bit uneven in its switching between ultra-horror and slapstick comedy.

For me, though, the reason I have a problem with I SPIT is, again, purely subjective. From my perspective, I just think the brutality of the perpetrators who commit the horrendous attacks on Camille Keaton is far greater than their comeuppance. Other people I have spoken with about this don't see it the same way.

I have no problem with a villain being portrayed as evil as he or she can be, but in a revenge picture (which all of these are), I want to see that fiend receive a punishment that is more vile than what he or she dished out. That's why I went into the remake with some dread, but was pleasantly surprised (and cheered at the prolonged suffering of the scumbags-turned-"victims").

I like this thread a lot, because it really brings out how we are all different in our visceral reactions to horror cinema. :up:

Alex K.
02-11-2017, 03:11 AM
I don't know. I thought Johnny's death was more than appropriate. The other two goons at the end I think she had to rush given the situation.

moviesludge
02-12-2017, 05:42 AM
The best revulsion is always something gross mixed with something sad. I saw MEET THE APPLEGATES when I was little (movie about a family who are secretly praying mantises in a "CONEHEADS" sort of way) and there's a scene where the daughter, who has gotten pregnant, finally gives birth to her baby (egg) and the cop dudes that have been after the family almost immediately stomp on it and splat it everywhere. It was a shock and grossed me out in a unique way that hasn't been matched.

Also I remember watching some violent action movie where some bad guys set a house on fire that has a family living in it and the bad guys just stand there watching it burn, the family struggles to climb out, and a kid who was like 4 or 5 years old manages to FALL off the top of the house to the ground and is immediately shot by the bad guys. Always thought that was pretty brutal and can't remember what movie it was.

Paul L
02-12-2017, 06:09 AM
Good point, moviesludge. Violence to children often hits hardest because it's such a big 'taboo' in most films - exploitation pictures or otherwise.

I always thought the scene in VIGILANTE, in which Robert Forster's character's young son is killed by a street thug with a shotgun, was shocking. Not particularly graphic, but it has a big impact because it's so against convention.

Matt H.
02-12-2017, 11:40 AM
I have no problem with a villain being portrayed as evil as he or she can be, but in a revenge picture (which all of these are), I want to see that fiend receive a punishment that is more vile than what he or she dished out. That's why I went into the remake with some dread, but was pleasantly surprised (and cheered at the prolonged suffering of the scumbags-turned-"victims").

I agree that nothing is more cathartic in a revenge film than to finally see the baddies get their comeuppance, but nowadays I sort of think of it as audience manipulation - in other words, the "moment you've been waiting for". Lately, I really admire when a director is willing to deny the audience that catharsis and not supply the expected payoff. A great example of this is IRREVERSIBLE, where we discover that the wrong man was punished for the rape (and since we see the rape after the revenge, it makes the scene that much more unbearable and sad).

moviesludge
02-13-2017, 10:14 PM
I feel like there have been a lot of movies lately where the filmmakers are angling to say "“Beware that, when fighting monsters, you yourself do not become a monster". So it has become popular to thematically chastise the character seeking revenge and make them out to be as bad as the villain of the movie. When I watched STRAW DOGS for the first time, I read that Pekinpah said that Dustin Hoffman's character is the villain. Hard to swallow imo. I feel like Korean movies have a field day with this sort of thing. Not only is the awful killer going to get away with all his crimes, but the hero is going to learn how much of a hopeless loser they are. I just watched I SAW THE DEVIL recently and it has to do with a lot of these ideas. I was pretty satisfied with how the whole story finished. It was a pretty interesting take on all these ideas.

Lorne Marshall
02-16-2017, 04:55 PM
I agree that nothing is more cathartic in a revenge film than to finally see the baddies get their comeuppance, but nowadays I sort of think of it as audience manipulation - in other words, the "moment you've been waiting for". Lately, I really admire when a director is willing to deny the audience that catharsis and not supply the expected payoff. A great example of this is IRREVERSIBLE, where we discover that the wrong man was punished for the rape (and since we see the rape after the revenge, it makes the scene that much more unbearable and sad).

I know that Gaspar Noé is considered a genius by many, and the structure of this film probably proves it. I see it as a form of audience manipulation as well, almost a challenge to not watch the entire movie. I say this because when I became aware the opening murder was committed against the wrong person, the moment the act that precipitated it came on, I would discontinue watching. Or, if I continued, really question myself as to why I would want to watch a scene like that knowing there was no redemption (much like my reaction midway through the second viewing of I SPIT ON YOUR GRAVE when I stopped the tape because, for me at least, I didn't feel her victims suffer enough), except maybe as an endurance test. Then again, maybe the structure of the film is supposed to be a condemnation by the director of those would want to watch such gruesome brutalization. I don't know.

Killer Meteor
02-17-2017, 07:29 AM
My first encounter with gore was at the age of 8, when I saw Sadie Frost vomiting over Van Helsing in Bram Stoker's Dracula - didn't see the rest of the film for nearly two years!

I was rather shaken by the violence in the original King Kong - all those shots of Kong chewing on people, and trampling them into the mud. And that homicidal brontosaurus gave me nightmares!

paul h.
02-17-2017, 08:26 PM
The robot-dolls attacking BARBARELLA really freaked me out as a child. Also the sadistic glee of the twins(?) who start the attack bothered me. I was cautious around dolls for years after that, and they're just a little spooky anyway.

Quot
02-17-2017, 08:46 PM
Back in the day, I was still young enough (20) for that damn Zuni fetish doll to freak me out. Well, that and creepy Karen Black sitting alone in the dark with her big-ass kitchen knife.

Rakesh R.
02-24-2017, 02:02 AM
Well, I would mention two things, one a movie and one a tv show. The shower scene in "Psycho" terrified me as a young lad( I made the mistake of watching it alone). It really upset me because Janet Leigh's character was very sympathetic to me and her early exit in such a brutal manner was a shocker. "Dragon's Domain" from "Space:1999" is the scariest thing I ever saw as a kid. That Lovecraftian creature was the stuff of trauma and nightmares for me. The scene where it attacks, devours, and then spits out the crew members is still horrifying.

Mark Tolch
02-24-2017, 09:13 AM
I thought of one...finally...though I would say I found it more disturbing than upsetting, if that makes any sense. I was watching THE DEAD ZONE the other day, and remembered the first time I saw it....the combination of the Dodd/scissor scene and the mom getting shot was a little much for me, and stayed with me for awhile. I forgot all about it until I revisited the film.

sukebanboy
02-24-2017, 10:16 AM
Another one for me.....

The scene in POLTERGEIST where the guy is looking in the mirror and his face melts.....
Was very young at the time.....stuck in my head..