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Alex K.
09-01-2012, 05:15 PM
Truly my most favorite genre of film. No question these kind of films are among my biggest influences. Though the term 'Art House' is ill-defined and at best representing anything overtly artistic, pretentious, experimental, non-linear, or foreign and doesn't conform to any particular genre. By extension Art House Horror films follow the above synopsis only with an emphasis on nihilism or a kind of horror that runs far deeper that the majority of others. So an Art House Horror film would have to be more than just being violent -so Fat Girl doesn't count- but in my opinion employs a kind of cosmic horror.

A couple of my favorites:

Eraserhead
Begotten
Subconscious Cruelty
Star of David Beauty Hunting
Lolita Vibrator Torture
The Beyond
A Bell From Hell
Un Chien Andalou
Koji Wakamatsu's Serial Rapist
Santa Sangre
The Devil's
Cannibal Holocaust
Herzog's Nosferatu
Videodrome

edkrak
09-01-2012, 06:51 PM
Also one of my favorite genres. I don't have much time for a lengthy post right now, so I'll only drop few titles for now:
Valerie and Her Week of Wonders (1970)
The Wicker Man (1973)
L'éden et après (1970) - not really sure if it can be called horror, this film is too great to just put a one word label on it
Jacob's Ladder (1990)
Sauna (2008)
Antichrist (2009)
Häxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages (1922)
In a Glass Cage (1987)
Onibaba (1964)
Vampyr (1932)
Hour of the Wolf (1968)
Lunacy (2005)
W starym dworku czyli niepodleglosc trójkatów (1985)

Alex K.
09-02-2012, 02:37 AM
Haxan and Jacob's Ladder are excellent choices! I don't think of Wicker Man as Art House Horror, but more of a horror musical. It would definitely qualify as Art House though.

sukebanboy
09-02-2012, 04:23 AM
Lolita Vibrator Torture

LOL...first time I have heard this described as "art house" horror..

great film no doubt about it......but I presume it COULD sneak into the category by being so "out there"..but then you would have to count all pinku / Roman Porno as "arthouse"...when they are maybe closer to "Sleazehouse"!!!

Robert W
09-02-2012, 08:38 AM
I would add Rollin's Lips of Blood to that list.

Alex K.
09-02-2012, 09:21 AM
Most of Rollin's filmography counts though. ;)

Ian Jane
09-02-2012, 10:45 AM
Jorge Buttgereit's stuff qualifies, I think, especially Schramm.

What about Gasper Noe's movies?

Alex K.
09-02-2012, 10:45 AM
^ Good call!

s.chivers
09-02-2012, 03:13 PM
Eyes Without A Face would surely fit the bill, as would Dr Jekyll et les femmes . Another of my personal favourites is Trouble Every Day.

bgart13
09-02-2012, 04:43 PM
POSSESSION is surely king of "art house horror," no?

Roderick
09-02-2012, 06:05 PM
Hausu

Richard--W
09-03-2012, 12:40 AM
I think John Parker's experimental Dementia (1955) and classics like Jack Clayton's The Innocents (1961), Robert Wise's The Haunting (1963) and Nicholas Roeg's Don't Look Now (1973) qualify as art-house horror. Harrington's Night Tide (1961) might qualify. Amenábar's The Others (2001), definitely.

What about the Val Lewton films?

Robin Bougie
09-03-2012, 04:34 AM
Hausu

Came here to say this. It's the ultimate.

Ian Jane
09-03-2012, 09:24 AM
Audition would probably qualify too. And PIG, which is getting re-released soon.

Alex K.
09-03-2012, 11:06 AM
Pig's getting re-released? Awesome, amazing short film.

Koukol
09-03-2012, 06:17 PM
POSSESSION is surely king of "art house horror," no?



Nope. :)

German Expressionism would be considered Arthouse Horror so I would say NOSFERATU would be King.

Alex K.
09-04-2012, 03:01 AM
The true measure for how Art House a film is lies in how unpronounceable the director's name is. So Andrzej Zulawski would trump Herzog ;) .

Speaking of Herzog I think Even Dwarfs Started Small is another big part of Art House Horror/Dark Comedy.

Koukol
09-04-2012, 02:17 PM
The true measure for how Art House a film is lies in how unpronounceable the director's name is. So Andrzej Zulawski would trump Herzog ;) .

Speaking of Herzog I think Even Dwarfs Started Small is another big part of Art House Horror/Dark Comedy.


Herzog's NOSFERATU is without doubt an important ArtHouse Horror film but I was talking about the GrandDaddy of Horror~Murnau's NOSFERATU.

Dom D
09-04-2012, 05:16 PM
Top thread. Love arthouse horror though can't think of any titles. I keep slapping myself on the head as people post new ones thinking 'yeah I love that film, why didn't I think of that?' Going to watch Spirit Of The Beehive today. Never seen it but from I've read it qualifies.

Paul Casey
09-04-2012, 05:41 PM
Top thread. Love arthouse horror though can't think of any titles. I keep slapping myself on the head as people post new ones thinking 'yeah I love that film, why didn't I think of that?' Going to watch Spirit Of The Beehive today. Never seen it but from I've read it qualifies.

I wouldn't call it horror, but it's a really wonderful film.

Marshall Crist
09-04-2012, 07:20 PM
As far as stuff that would fit in here, I would say VALERIE AND HER WEEK OF WONDERS is probably my favorite. That said, I have a pretty low threshold of what I consider "artsy," and would easily include DEATH BED, LEMORA, MALATESTA, EYES OF FIRE and the like.

Ian Jane
09-04-2012, 07:47 PM
Surely Bergman's The Virgin Spring would have to fit in here somewhere as well, not only because of what it is but because of what it inspired.

And what about Singapore Sling?

Alex K.
09-05-2012, 01:44 AM
I think Hour of the Wolf or Seventh Seal is a greater representation of Bergman and Art House Horror.

I've tried watching Singapore Sling so many times (at least 5 times I think) and have never been able to get through it. It just bored me to tears and the acting was an imitation of Cafe Flesh/Dr. Caligari but not as engaging.

On that note Dr. Caligari is perhaps an Art House Horror Dark Comedy. The opening is certainly a kind of Bunuel-ian horror.

Dom D
09-05-2012, 03:22 AM
By chance watched The Virgin Spring earlier today. Horrors definitely a stretch. Being Bergman there was a lot less blood and breasts and a lot more people staring off past the camera complaining about how cold it is in winter. I know Bergman's Swedish and all but wow that guy really takes offence to winter. Hour Of The Wolf is top class Arthouse Horror. Almost turned it off in frustration during the first half hour but it winds going to some very interesting places. Quite creepy.

Randy G
09-05-2012, 04:32 AM
Love Hour of the Wolf, also must mention ALUCARDA, best combination of avant garde theatre/film (panic) and horror/exploitation ever.

Koukol
09-05-2012, 02:05 PM
I think Hour of the Wolf or Seventh Seal is a greater representation of Bergman and Art House Horror.

On that note Dr. Caligari is perhaps an Art House Horror Dark Comedy. The opening is certainly a kind of Bunuel-ian horror.


Yes Bergman called HOUR [U]his[U] horror film.

We call MASQUE OF RED DEATH a horror film then SEVENTH is surely a Art-House Horror film...no? (not directed to you, Alex)
Some other Arthouse films with Horror elements (like VIRGIN SPRING) would be the original HOUSE OF USHER, BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, ORPHEUS,VAMPYR,PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC, JULIET OF THE SPIRITS SPIRITS OF THE DEAD...and I would argue SUSPIRIA.

I would also add that most, if not all, of David Lynch's work would be ArtHouse Horror

Alex K.
09-05-2012, 02:12 PM
A lot of the great Italian horrors could be argued as being Art House. The best works by the three masters definitely counts.

Richard--W
09-06-2012, 01:32 AM
Top thread. Love arthouse horror though can't think of any titles. I keep slapping myself on the head as people post new ones thinking 'yeah I love that film, why didn't I think of that?' Going to watch Spirit Of The Beehive today. Never seen it but from I've read it qualifies.

Let us know your thoughts on Spirit of the Beehive.

Your independent noir looks very interesting. Visually you got the style down. I want to see the film when it's done.

Are you sure you want to stick with the name Jack Mitchum?

Dom D
09-06-2012, 03:30 AM
Thanks Richard. Doing a 40s period movie with a production budget of $3000 is challenging but almost there now.

Didn't love Spirit Of The Beehive. I think it's difficult to do a movie that's so visually driven with child actors. They're not capable of the emoting required for us to understand what they're thinking without dialogue. I guess some might like that that makes the film even more enigmatic but I just got a bit frustrated.

Richard--W
09-06-2012, 04:57 PM
i appreciate the shoestring budget constraint. But it appears you accomplish on a lot on a little.

Do consider carefully the use of that name.

Alex K.
09-10-2012, 04:41 PM
Divided into Zero is an amazing short film on a pedophile serial killer. Very similar to Subconscious Cruelty for obvious reasons.

My personal favorite of all time that I've mentioned before but it doesn't seem to get a lot of recognition is A Bell from Hell. Just a masterful art horror film that has a streak of dark humor and an unnatural nightmarish tone from beginning to end.

Ian Jane
09-10-2012, 05:20 PM
A Bell From Hell is great. Such a weird story behind the making of that one too.

Did In A Glass Cage get any love in this thread yet? Because if it didn't, it should.

Horace Cordier
09-10-2012, 05:48 PM
Just picked up CAGE for under $15 on Amazon, new on Blu. Looking forward to seeing it for the first time.

How about THE SKIN I LIVE IN? Crazy film with almost soap opera elements but man it has art house style.

Randy G
09-11-2012, 03:50 AM
When I noticed some critics putting SKIN I LIVE IN down for the sf elements I knew I'd dig it. Terrific last scene too.

Alex K.
09-11-2012, 07:51 AM
Ultimate Art House Horror Dark Comedy: Death Bed.

Body Boy
09-11-2012, 06:39 PM
The Driller Killer is a great art house horror flick, misunderstood because it's approached as a typical slasher film.

Alex K.
09-11-2012, 06:49 PM
I'd hesitate to call Driller Killer art house horror. It has it's moments sure, but I consider it more of a punk horror film with shades of Taxi Driver.

Paul Casey
09-11-2012, 07:21 PM
punk horror film

Quit making shit up.

Alex K.
09-11-2012, 07:36 PM
Quit making shit up.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwNRXmdrEkA

Keep out of this old man.

Koukol
09-11-2012, 08:16 PM
Yeah DK was made in NY at an exciting time in rock music (Punk Rock)


Speaking of "punk"...TETSUO should be considered an Art House film.

Alex K.
09-12-2012, 09:58 PM
The Tetsuo: The Iron Man trilogy is definitely art house horror. Love the first film myself.

Another good choice -having recently checked out a couple of Tony Scott films- is The Hunger. Amazing looking film, not the greatest story but if there was ever a film that 'worked' purely on aesthetics this would be a big contender.

Robert W
09-12-2012, 10:31 PM
The Bela Lugosi's Dead scene at the beginning always struck me as one the best filmed scenes from an 80s genre flick.

Koukol
09-12-2012, 11:03 PM
Other Japanese films would be (forgive me if I get the names wrong)
KURONEKO
JIGOKU
KWAIDAN
KAIDAN
& ONIBABA

George Barry
09-12-2012, 11:31 PM
Ultimate Art House Horror Dark Comedy: Death Bed.

Thanks Alex. (&) Thanks Marshall too.

Of course, I realize you might be referring to the other Death Bed (the one that doesn't eat), but even if that's the case, Thank You regardless.

Ian Jane
09-13-2012, 09:32 AM
The one that eats is far superior to the one that doesn't.

You should talk to Cult Epics about getting it on Blu-ray, George!

Alex K.
09-13-2012, 10:34 AM
I meant the bed that eats.

http://thecinemasnob.com/2010/01/28/death-bed-the-bed-that-eats.aspx

Marshall Crist
09-13-2012, 12:26 PM
Thanks Alex. (&) Thanks Marshall too.

Of course, I realize you might be referring to the other Death Bed (the one that doesn't eat), but even if that's the case, Thank You regardless.

Great. The cartilage is decaying. They'll fall off one by one.

Quot
09-13-2012, 05:32 PM
First post -- wanted to reiterate what a great film In a Glass Cage is. Disturbing, yes, but also brilliantly filmed and directed. Great pick for this topic.

Also want to add Calvaire -- don't think it's been mentioned yet -- a rather unsettling film reminiscent of Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Deliverance and Southern Comfort. Will make you think twice about driving through the Belgium countryside.

Ian Jane
09-13-2012, 05:38 PM
Also want to add Calvaire -- don't think it's been mentioned yet -- a rather unsettling film reminiscent of Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Deliverance and Southern Comfort. Will make you think twice about driving through the Belgium countryside.

Howdy! Good call on Calvaire. Also worth seeing for Brigitte's cameo! I really enjoyed that movie, pretty twisted stuff but very nicely made.

Alex K.
09-14-2012, 08:43 PM
Maybe some of you would get something out of this Eraserhead rip off?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66sh52rVCwQ

Richard--W
09-14-2012, 09:09 PM
i wish I could get my hands on a copy of the art-house film BEGOTTEN without having to mortgage the house to pay for it.

Alex K.
09-14-2012, 09:11 PM
I remember reading that Merhige is interested in doing a Blu for Begotten. The reason why it hasn't been re-issued is that he's dissatisfied with the limitations of DVD.

Koukol
09-14-2012, 10:11 PM
I remember reading that Merhige is interested in doing a Blu for Begotten. The reason why it hasn't been re-issued is that he's dissatisfied with the limitations of DVD.


What limitations would the DVD format have with a film like BEGOTTEN...did he say?

Alex K.
09-14-2012, 10:14 PM
It was in terms of resolution. Merhige is very passionate about the theater experience and feels that Blu is as close as possible to the look of film.

Koukol
09-15-2012, 02:49 PM
I find that very strange since the film is so grainy.

Alex K.
09-16-2012, 02:03 PM
Maybe it wasn't supposed to look that grainy? Food for thought.

Randy G
09-16-2012, 04:35 PM
Friedel's AXE is one of the real gems of American exploitation, a terrific combination of art/horror. Ditto LET'S SCARE JESSICA TO DEATH, which has the vibe of a classic 70s disillusioned counterculture sleeper crossed with a horror/ghost story.

Richard--W
09-16-2012, 09:42 PM
Well, I wish Merhige would get off his laurels and release BEGOTTEN in either or format so that I can get a copy, damnit.

Alex K.
10-01-2012, 01:58 AM
I don't think anyone mentioned The Reflecting Skin. Great film! One of the best. Why doesn't it have a special edition DVD?

Randy G
10-02-2012, 05:36 AM
I could imagine Criterion being interested in releasing THE REFLECTING SKIN. A truly creepy and unique film.

Toyboy
10-14-2012, 10:05 PM
I just watched Almadovar's latest, THE SKIN I LIVE IN - a unique take on the traditional "mad doctor tries to restore his disfigured wife's face" but with bits of OLDBOY-style revenge and Cronenberg body horror. Beautiful and twisted.

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b300/spacemonkey_fg/Blog%20Pictures%20II/Piel1.jpg

Toyboy
10-14-2012, 10:13 PM
POSSESSION is surely king of "art house horror," no?

Was gonna agree with you on this but then remembered SANTA SANGRE. That may trump it.

Randy G
10-18-2012, 05:47 AM
I just watched Almadovar's latest, THE SKIN I LIVE IN - a unique take on the traditional "mad doctor tries to restore his disfigured wife's face" but with bits of OLDBOY-style revenge and Cronenberg body horror. Beautiful and twisted.


Already mentioned that I love this, seen it a few times now. The storyline is similar to a sf book from the 70s called Season of the Witch where a rapist is transformed into a woman via surgery. The author Harry Stine transitioned into a woman and is now known as Jean Marie Stine, it was recently reissued is as a 'transgender classic.' (http://www.amazon.com/Season-Witch-Transgender-Futuristic-Classic/dp/1600893198/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1350553874&sr=1-1&keywords=season+of+the+witch+stine'transgender)

Quot
12-07-2012, 09:08 PM
Anyone seen Sauna (Antti-Jussi Annila , 2008)?

Sounds interesting, in addition to being a good candidate for this thread.

Scott
12-07-2012, 10:11 PM
Daughters of Darkness
Malpertuis
Company of Wolves (maybe)
Cannibal Man (maybe)

Marshall Crist
12-21-2012, 04:10 PM
Here's the cast of my new ALUCARDA/BLOOD ON SATAN'S CLAW mash-up. NSFW.

http://i.imgur.com/odpG3.jpg

Randy G
12-22-2012, 06:05 AM
Sombre by Phillipe Grandrieux hasn't got the attention it deserves from genre fans. A very minimalist, literally dark film about a serial killer and his relationship with one of his potential victims. Imagine a horror film shot by Bela Tarr with shaky cam. The awesome score is by Alan Vega from Suicide.


http://youtu.be/ncqQPs_FasI

The Lake by Grandrieux is also worth checking out, he is very unique and his best work is very immersive and hypnotic.

Alex K.
12-23-2012, 06:39 AM
Here's the cast of my new ALUCARDA/BLOOD ON SATAN'S CLAW mash-up. NSFW.

http://i.imgur.com/odpG3.jpg

I like it! Keep us informed!

nekromantik93
09-12-2013, 04:45 PM
Well, I'm a bit late but Art House Horror would also be my favorite genre. Here are some films that would maybe qualify IMO.

- Angst (1983)
- Man bites dog
- Henry : Portrait (Maybe...)
- Manson Family
- Flesh for Frankenstein and Blood for Dracula
- Cemetery Man
- The Addiction
- Buio Omega (Maybe...)
- Awakening of the Beast ( José Mojica Marins)
- The Devils

Alex K.
09-12-2013, 06:12 PM
Awakening of the Beast is fucking amazing and my favorite Coffin Joe film.

Koukol
09-12-2013, 07:18 PM
I would say Herzog's NOSFERATU would be "King of the Arthouse Horror" as Herzog is one of the greatest Arthouse directors and more people know NOSFERATU over anything mentioned so far.

Quot
09-12-2013, 07:57 PM
Started at the beginning and went through the entire thread to make sure these haven't been mentioned yet:

(to be fair, these probably fall more into the arthouse/thriller genre, but they're really so much like a good Lynchian slow-burn, they should be mentioned):

Fear X (Nicolas Winding Refn)
Nuit Noire (Olivier Smolders)
Hotel (Jessica Hausner) - i believe Ian is a fan of this one.

What these films share is a focus on the interpretive aspects of dream-logic narrative, with little or scant regard for real-world plotting, at least in a traditional sense. I mean, things happen in these films, but, more importantly, so much doesn't happen. Often, many questions are raised (as in a standard Lynch film) but answers are really nowhere to be found. At least, they aren't spoon-fed. They can, however, often be inferred from various, seemingly unconnected events, which is what makes it kind of fun (to me, anyway).

These types of films are almost solely devoted to atmosphere and implied terror (or dread). Frequently, the viewer's anticipation is framed within beautiful cinematography or impeccably creepy sound design and usually both. These films are often criticized for not telling a proper story (ie., traditional or coherent). But for patient viewers, like me, they really fire my stimuli receptors and are, frankly, cinema nivana for me.

Any other similar types of recent films (where atmosphere and implied dread are emphasized over explcit gore or violence) that folks here can recommend? I'm certainly game.