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Wllm Clys
10-12-2012, 02:16 PM
I just watched Tragic Ceremony and loved it. Already saw Muder Obsession.
What else do I really need to see?

Andrew Monroe
10-12-2012, 02:35 PM
I would say these are a must:

THE HORRIBLE DR. HICHCOCK
DOUBLE FACE
THE GHOST
THE IGUANA WITH THE TONGUE OF FIRE
CALTIKI THE IMMORTAL MONSTER
MACISTE ALL'INFERNO

He made a good spaghetti western that, while not essential, is worth a look if you like the genre - DEATH DOES NOT COUNT THE DOLLARS.

Robert W
10-12-2012, 04:04 PM
Dr. Hitchcock is an incredible looking films, easily the equal of anything Bava did, imo. It's also got Babs, so that just makes it about the perfect Italian gothic.

Koukol
10-12-2012, 05:21 PM
Yes, HORRIBLE DR HICHCOCK AND THE GHOST are top tier Italian Gothics.

Wllm Clys
12-26-2012, 06:01 PM
Followed the recommendations, I watched Dr. Hicchcock and really liked it. A great gothic horror with a slight feeling of dementia. Right up my alley. Next up: The Ghost!

slizwiz
01-22-2015, 11:12 AM
we talked about Tragic Ceremony on the podcast!

http://hellodoomedshow.podomatic.com

:p:rock:

Dom D
01-23-2015, 05:33 PM
When I was first getting into euro horror back before the DVD revolution I recall in the guides I read to the genre Freda was always mentioned in the same breath as Bava and Margheritti as the three masters of the genre. There was always an implication that later masters like Argento and Fulci were lesser lights just holding onto the coat tails. Probably this was because Argento and Fulci were a lot easier to get hold of at the time... Well Freda's really managed to drop from the conversation hasn't he? In the early days I put this down to lack of availability of his films. Bava was so well represented in the early days of DVD that he just became The Guy. Having seen a lot of Freda's films over the years though I've got to say those early guides I was reading really talked him up a lot more than I would.

Dr Hitchcock and The Ghost. It's a wierd thing. I own The Ghost and I'm sure I would have watched it but I have no recollection of this film at all. Dr hitchcock meanwhile looks great, sounds great, has tremendous atmosphere, is, sadly, as dumb as they come. This starts out as a pretty twisted and psychologically interesting piece. It winds up as another bathe-in-the-blood-of-virgins flick. Hugely disappointing to see such a promising film just fall apart at the seams the way this one does.

Iguana and Double Face. Average to slightly above average gialli. I'll take any Lenzi giallo (except Ice Of Knife) over these.

Caltiki. Good Blob rip off. It's fine but aiming to make a good Blob rip off is aiming pretty damned low. Vaguely I seem to recall reading that Bava was actually at the tiller for this one anyway or am I misremembering?

Paul L
01-24-2015, 05:45 AM
When I was first getting into euro horror back before the DVD revolution I recall in the guides I read to the genre Freda was always mentioned in the same breath as Bava and Margheritti as the three masters of the genre. There was always an implication that later masters like Argento and Fulci were lesser lights just holding onto the coat tails.
Ditto. The triumvirate, when I was becoming interested in European horror films, was always Bava, Freda and Margheriti. Freda's dropped off the radar somewhat, I reckon solely because of the absence of much of his work from the DVD format (at least, in terms of legitimate releases), whereas Anchor Bay's releases of Bava's films foregrounded his films. Margheriti's star descended a little because his weakest films seemed to get the best releases on DVD, whilst his strongest films were hard to find in decent DVD incarnations. (I rewatched THE LONG HAIR OF DEATH recently, via the Raro Blu, and was reminded just how enticing I found this film when I first saw it on UK television, where it was screened as part of the Moviedrome series in 1989/1990/1991 or thereabouts.

Freda's films stand out slightly because they're much more focused on internals than either Margheriti or Bava's films (or those of later filmmakers like Fulci and Argento, or even, like you say, Umberto Lenzi or Sergio Martino). I really like Freda's films, but despite similar external trappings they're very different from the work of those other filmmakers. I think the exposure during the DVD era (which, let's face it, encompasses nearly 20 years now - wow!) of those Italian horror filmmakers whose work is more heavily focused on externals makes Freda's films seem anaemic, slow and unfocused in comparison; but I think if you're attuned to them, they weave their own special kind of magic. But then, some of Freda's films offered my first exposure to Italian horror cinema, so the images from DR HICHCOCK, for example, haunt my memory.

Alex K.
01-24-2015, 05:59 AM
I've yet to watch The Ghost but I haven't enjoyed a single Freda film. Fear comes the closest to being enjoyable but even then it's only barely. I honestly can't remember if I've seen Horridble Dr. Hitchcock. I think the cult movie critics appraised him because if it weren't for him Bava wouldn't have gotten into directing. And he was of the same era as Bava even though he wasn't as interesting.

The 90's and early 2000's was an interesting time for Italo Horror and Euro Cult pictures.

Tim R-T-C
01-26-2015, 06:27 AM
When I was first getting into euro horror back before the DVD revolution I recall in the guides I read to the genre Freda was always mentioned in the same breath as Bava and Margheritti as the three masters of the genre. There was always an implication that later masters like Argento and Fulci were lesser lights just holding onto the coat tails. Probably this was because Argento and Fulci were a lot easier to get hold of at the time... Well Freda's really managed to drop from the conversation hasn't he? In the early days I put this down to lack of availability of his films. Bava was so well represented in the early days of DVD that he just became The Guy. Having seen a lot of Freda's films over the years though I've got to say those early guides I was reading really talked him up a lot more than I would.

It doesn't help that it is really hard to know which films he actually directed - it is hard to complement a director's style when you might actually be praising a film he let someone else helm! I'm sure a lot of people talked him up for I Vampiri before discovering that he is only partly responsible for it.

I have reviewed a selection of Freda films, mostly his non horror titles, and written a short bio - Riccardo Freda guide (http://www.mondo-esoterica.net/links_pages/Riccardo%20Freda.html).

killer must kill again
01-27-2015, 01:10 PM
It doesn't help that it is really hard to know which films he actually directed - it is hard to complement a director's style when you might actually be praising a film he let someone else helm! I'm sure a lot of people talked him up for I Vampiri before discovering that he is only partly responsible for it.


this! it seems like every ricardo freda movie I saw he was only partly involved, let someone else direct or wasn't much fond of what he was doing.. I even remember some crew member being interviewed for "murder obssesion", he states that freda wasn't on set most of the time and if he was, he was really bored.