PDA

View Full Version : stop listening



Richard--W
10-15-2012, 11:13 AM
I've decided to stop listening to music.

I'm versed in early American blues, jazz and folk, 19th century Americana music, the earliest sound recordings on wax cylinders and discs, up through rockabilly and early rock n roll through the British invasion and singer-songwriters of the 1960s and 1970s, funk and soul and pop, heavy metal and punk, etc etc. The time has come to put music in the past. Listening takes up too much time. One sits there and listens while doing idle stuff because all one's energy goes into the act of listening when one should be doing workable stuff.

Except soundtracks and sound effects. That's the only music I plan to keep up with, both past and present. But intermittently. Not all the time.

Roderick
10-15-2012, 11:17 AM
Crazy talk. But whatever works for you.

Ian Jane
10-15-2012, 11:22 AM
Listening takes up too much time. One sits there and listens while doing idle stuff because all one's energy goes into the act of listening when one should be doing workable stuff.

I completely disagree. I have music playing constantly during my work day and when I'm working at home on writing or whatever else that may come up, I've probably got music going there too. I think if I were to remove that, my life would be less fun for it.

But yeah, whatever works for you. Different strokes for different folks and all that.

Mark Tolch
10-15-2012, 11:45 AM
I completely disagree. I have music playing constantly during my work day and when I'm working at home on writing or whatever else that may come up, I've probably got music going there too. I think if I were to remove that, my life would be less fun for it.

But yeah, whatever works for you. Different strokes for different folks and all that.

Yup. Music is my one constant. I always have music playing. Have since I was a wee lad. Most of my memories have songs tied to them. It's a great feeling.

Barry M
10-15-2012, 12:06 PM
Sounds like work. Why not just stop paying attention? Lazy is usually the best option.

Andrew Monroe
10-15-2012, 12:08 PM
I live for music. I could give up movies a lot easier than music. Music has gotten me through some very tough times. The anticipation of music yet to be discovered is what keeps me going even in the hardest times. Much like Mark, music has been a constant in my life since I was a tot. If it works for you, great, but it's something I really can't comprehend - giving up music.

Mark Tolch
10-15-2012, 12:11 PM
I don't understand how sound effects are less distracting.....

Clive Smith
10-15-2012, 12:15 PM
Music tends to improve my concentration when I'm working. And I can irritate colleagues with my selections ("Is this more of your electronic shite?").

Roderick
10-15-2012, 12:16 PM
I don't understand how sound effects are less distracting.....


http://youtu.be/PufhB4C-AEQ

Todd Jordan
10-15-2012, 01:06 PM
If I stopped listening to music I would be bored, especially at work. It helps pass the time, isn't distracting in the least to me, and giving it up would be like giving up tacos, herb, and orgasms. For me, it's a non-option. Why would you deny yourself some great stuff? I can understand not paying attention to genres or time periods of music, but altogether? Heresy.

Paul Casey
10-16-2012, 11:49 AM
Can you still listen to Crawl Unit - Stop Listening?

http://www.alien8recordings.com/release_image/name/49/size600/stoplistening.jpg

paul h.
10-16-2012, 12:10 PM
You might need to stop thinking so much. If you think too much, you implode. Turn off your mind.

Of course, suit yourself. I've taken breaks from listening to and playing music before for extended periods, just for a change of scenery. I don't believe that I could quit it forever though.

paul h.
10-17-2012, 10:31 PM
Anyway. I hope I didn't offend, because that was not my intent. I wasn't trying to be snarky or smart-ass, but offer the suggestion of meditation or whatever equivalent might work for you. The samurai even spoke of the power-of-not-thinking.

Richard--W
10-18-2012, 01:13 AM
Not at all Paul h, I hear where you're coming from. Maybe I've just lost interest. One can't keep up with all the new music nor ever catch up with all the old, which is always new the first time you hear it. More to the point, music engages the emotions more than the mind. Music is an emotional experience rather than an intellectual one. Right now I don't want to go there -- wherever the music takes you. I'm tailoring a business plan for a financier's specific quirks, and trying to consolidate 300 endnotes into half as many and still match the narrative text, so that's where my mind is engaged. A movie or two at night breaks up the monotony.

I just learned that Bob Dylan's recording sessions for the great, great Blood On the Tracks album (September 1974) will be the next 2-disc set in The Bootleg Series. My resolution will last until that is released, the date as yet unannounced, and then go back into effect again.

Meanwhile I listen to spaghetti western sound track CDs on the long drives to and from Phoenix. I'm working my way through Stelvio Cipriani, Bruno Nicolai, Francesco Masi and other spaghetti western composers. I wonder how complex and expensive it would be to get the rights to apply some of this music to a low-budget indy film. I'm still exploring the genre, but I've seen enough to decide I like the music more than the films generally. If anyone would like to contribute clones of scarce | oop | pricey scores to this effort it would be appreciated.

paul h.
10-18-2012, 09:23 AM
Cool. I can dig it. I've had to avoid a great deal of music lately because of emotions and memories connected to it.

Thanks for the tip of the upcoming Dylan release, I have a copy of that 'Blood On the Tapes' bootleg cd, and sometimes I prefer it to the legitimate release.

Barry M
10-18-2012, 09:53 AM
Blood on the Tracks, eh? I'd listen to that.

Richard--W
10-18-2012, 10:28 AM
Cool. I can dig it. I've had to avoid a great deal of music lately because of emotions and memories connected to it.

Thanks for the tip of the upcoming Dylan release, I have a copy that 'Blood On the Tapes' bootleg cd, and sometimes I prefer it to the legitimate release.

Yeah I have a few boots of the sessions. I've had a reel-to-reel tape of the original acetate and one of the first reel-to-reel tapes of the outtakes since they started circulating in the mid-1970s. The raw tape has a deeper, fuller, richer sound than any of the boots. Columbia has more songs and more takes of the songs, however.

The thing you need to know about Blood On the Tracks is that Dylan told Columbia to speed it up 2 seconds faster. I don't know if his directive was carried over to the SACD hybrid edition. To hear the album at the speed it was recorded, listen to Columbia's old virgin vinyl "Half-Speed Masters" LP. I own the LP and I may have a CD-R of it somewhere. Likewise, the outtakes that appear on the boots and on The Bootleg Series are also in the actual recorded speed. I grew up listening to the album 2 seconds fast since that was the official release. But I prefer the recorded speed.

Recently I upgraded my copy of the outtake of "Hurricane" with Emmylou Harris, from the Desire sessions in 1975. It is 100% better than the officially released take, but some of the wording regarding who killed whom in the bar was actionable. The lawyers persuaded Dylan to record the song again with a slight change in the lyrics because he couldn't win the lawsuit that would follow release. By that time Emmylou Harris had left and the new vocalist -- Ronee Blakely -- her voice didn't support his as well. The band was snappier on the original take as well. After the original recording was destroyed a couple of cassettes leaked out, probably through Dylan himself. My latest upgrade comes from one of those cassettes.

Utterly useless trivia like this crowds my brain and is partly what I'm trying to stay away from.