• The Strain: The Fall #6



    Released by: Dark Horse Comics
    Released on: December 18, 2013
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    The series continues here from the second book of The Strain trilogy, with Eph now in FBI custody after his failed assassination attempt of wealthy industrialist Eldritch Palmer. The Feds mock Eph’s story about vampires and soon Eph’s whisked off to another part of the city in Eldritch’s helicopter.

    Meanwhile, Gus takes Setrakian and Fet to meet the Old Ones, the original, ancient vampires that are none too pleased with The Master’s actions and want him stopped, once and for all. The newcomers take some convincing but Setrakian knows that the only way to get at The Master is to obtain the ancient tome, the Occido Lumen, and these Old Ones might have the financial backing to help him do that. He and Fet are soon off to Sotheby’s, to engage in a bidding war for the book with The Master’s right-hand man, the Nazi that killed Setrakian’s wife...





    Eph’s destination is at Palmer’s penthouse apartment, where the villain is relishing the chance to monologue against Eph and his “sad uprising.” Eph knows he’s pretty well beaten here but is able to lay out for Palmer what he sees as the problem with the plan - namely, that The Master has no real use for him, making him stand in line with the rest of humanity. This clearly troubles Palmer who quickly dismisses Eph and has him returned to the FBI. But it’s clear that the Feds aren’t prepared for the reality that’s coming their way…


    All this while, Nora is still attempting to escape the city via the underground with Zak and her senile mother in-tow. She knows that her mother is only slowing them down and, seeing her options quickly dwindle, realizes to save them all she’ll have to put her mom out of her misery. But her humanity gets in the way at the crucial moment, which prevents her from completing the horrible task. Thankfully, the pursuing vampires show up, allowing her some grief counseling…

    David Lapham’s script continues to balance all the salient character moments - which, here, are especially dramatic - with a sense of calm action. Mike Huddleston’s artwork also continues to excellently support the multi-faceted narrative as well. Another excellent entry in this highly-entertaining series.