• Peter Panzerfaust #21



    Published by: Image Comics
    Released on: Oct. 1, 2014


    As this issue opens closer to the present day, it’s Peter’s son John continuing his quest to find out more about who his father truly was. He meets an old friend of Peter’s named Maurice in a bar who tells him that surviving the war wasn’t the hard part - figuring out what to do after it was…

    Cut to Paris, 1942, and Maurice is not happy with how things are going there. Peter’s resistance fighters have returned to Paris now where it seems the war is actually over. Maurice is feeling like his old self died and he became a new man during his time with the resistance in the countryside. But, now, it’s as if all joy has left him. They believed that Peter, Julien and Lily to be dead so they were all feeling despondent and taking it out in different ways.

    Maurice and his twin brother Claude lament their current state, mostly saddened by the friends they’ve lost and general feelings of ineptitude and failure overall. They eventually come to blows one night over it, with Claude reminding Maurice of his personal cost of sacrifice, that being something he feels Maurice could never understand.

    Elsewhere, it’s fellow survivors Mary and Gilbert who get a chance to discuss this “new quiet” of their lives. But they don’t miss the danger, certainly. Gilbert talks Wendy through to the point of letting Peter go, that he’s gone for good and they only have each other now. He then decides that they need to have a memorial for their fallen leaders and then split up the group for good.

    Gilbert waits until the twins arrive back at their headquarters before informing them of this. He’s concerned for their mental well being overall but, also, is sick of how they’ve been ignoring each other’s feelings of grief and loss. They, again, come to blows but are interrupted by not only a surprise appearance but, also, by a surprising reveal linking the characters all together.

    Since in the previous issue we said goodbye to Julien and Lily the story now gets to move in another new storyline/direction. Kurtis Wiebe is at his peak here, relishing the chance clearly as he sets up his characters with a great deal of dramatic ethos and tension to contend with. Tyler Jenkins artwork is somber and moody here, perfectly suiting the tone of dispossession felt by all the characters, continuing his excellent work here. This issue is Part 1 of the story titled On ‘till Morning and looks to continue in the next issue as well. Now is the time, then, to get in on one of the best titles being published today.