• James Bond #10



    James Bond #10
    Released by: Dynamite Entertainment
    Released on: October 5th, 2016.
    Written by: Warren Ellis
    Illustrated by: Jason Masters
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    When we last left 007, he was in a train tunnel believed to be in use for the government’s Strategic Fleet Reserve program. In reality, it’s occupied by Hawkwood and his heavily armed associates and they’re none too happy to see Bond show up. Bond makes his way through the train yard undercover of the darkness, shooting his way across and using a well-timed explosive device to cause a distraction. When he comes face to face with the fifth and final man in the tunnel, the man asks him to take him to doctor. He’s injured. Bond simply replies ‘No’ and knocks him out. Ruthless!

    The man wakes up in a safe house of some sort, Bond and a hooded associate, Bill from the CIA, wielding box cutters. This guy might have been trained to resist torture, but it’s not going to be enough. Back at MI-6 headquarters, Bond is in M’s office with Birdwhistle and Bill who explains to them that Eidolon is a ‘system of SPECTRE stay-behinds.’ These were secret groups scattered about Europe during World War II to keep an eye on things and act on them should Britain feel it necessary. SPECTRE was taken out but these four person splinter cells are obviously still around and the British cell might just contain a high ranking MI-5 member named… Hawkwood. It’s all starting to tie together now. It was Hawkwood’s team that tried to kill Bond and Birdwhistle at Heathrow. Clearly there’s an Eidolon cell alive and well inside MI-5, and its members are out to get MI-6. The big question now… is why?

    Eve Sharma meets with Bond. M meets with MI-5’s Sir Stephen Mackmain and the Commissioner. Clearly this is a matter of domestic security, but if MI-5, in charge of domestic security, is compromised, then what?

    While it’s a little odd seeing Bond resort to torturing a suspect as he does in this issue, desperate times would seem to call for desperate measures and let’s face it – Ellis’ take on the character has been hard-edged and ‘all business’ since the first scene in the first issue. Bond is driven and will do what needs to be done, even if he does it on the sly away from his superiors, to ensure he completes his mission. This particular mission is interesting because it, to a certain extent at least, pits one side of the government against another where normally they’d be working together against a common enemy. It’s interesting to see how the story takes Bond and the rest of MI-6 into some unexpected and interesting directions this time around. Ellis’ run has been a lot more than just sending Bond out after the ‘villain of the month,’ he’s instead crafting some genuine suspense and doing so with some admirably heavy plotting.

    Jason Masters’ artwork is on par with the first nine issues of the series. He draws the characters well and has a nice eye for bringing action to life but still leaves some of the backgrounds a little empty or static looking. A bit more detail in this department would go a long way. Otherwise, the visuals are solid. Guy Majors’ coloring work is nice and this issue’s cover from artist Dom Reardon is gorgeous.