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Thread: The Invisible Man Reboot In The Works

  1. #11
    I'll make an exception for that.
    "Ah! By god's balls what licentiousness!"

    Marquis de Sade, The 120 Days of Sodom.

  2. #12
    Senior Member John Bernhard's Avatar
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    Trailer had more of a GHOST vibe than anything else......hard left and a pass.

  3. #13
    Intellectual Carrot Scott's Avatar
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    This looks awful.
    "When I die, I hope to go to Accra"

  4. #14
    Senior Member Nabonga's Avatar
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    Why is Elisabeth Moss a thing? I know she's scientology but still. Is that really enough to get as much work and exposure as she does? Truly one of the most uninteresting people on the planet. She uglay as fuck too.
    https://www.instagram.com/moviemorpho83/

    Oh, not on Cauliflower! Oh, not on Broccoli!

  5. #15
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    Ugly isn't the right word. She has a very odd look to her. Only seen her in Handmaid's Tale. SHe was ok in the few episodes I saw.

  6. #16
    Administrator Ian Jane's Avatar
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    Rock! Shock! Pop!

  7. #17
    Intellectual Carrot Scott's Avatar
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    I rewatched the original film over the holidays and the one thing all the remakes and sequels get wrong is the tone (and the setting). It's not a horror movie. It's a comedy. And it's hilarious.

    A lot of the joy for me (that is also found in the other Universal Horror movies from the same time) is that nebulous eastern European setting taking place in a vague pre-war time village with everyone acting like backwater rubes. Taking all that out strips away the character fun. I can only imagine a modern Invisible Man movie is going to be him fucking with people's cell phones and shit.

    They're never going to get a better director than James Whale and they're never going to get a better actor than Claude Rains.
    "When I die, I hope to go to Accra"

  8. #18
    MCMLXXX Matt H.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott View Post
    I rewatched the original film over the holidays and the one thing all the remakes and sequels get wrong is the tone (and the setting). It's not a horror movie. It's a comedy. And it's hilarious.

    A lot of the joy for me (that is also found in the other Universal Horror movies from the same time) is that nebulous eastern European setting taking place in a vague pre-war time village with everyone acting like backwater rubes. Taking all that out strips away the character fun. I can only imagine a modern Invisible Man movie is going to be him fucking with people's cell phones and shit.

    They're never going to get a better director than James Whale and they're never going to get a better actor than Claude Rains.
    Exactly. It's a mistake to play it straight.

    Carl Gottlieb got it:

    Why would anybody watch a scum show like Videodrome? Why did you watch it, Max?

  9. #19
    Intellectual Carrot Scott's Avatar
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    Haha I love that bit so much!
    "When I die, I hope to go to Accra"

  10. #20

    THE INVISIBLE MAN (2020)

    The best way to approach Leigh Whannell's THE INVISIBLE MAN is to forget about H.G. Wells' novel and most of the prior film adaptations from James Whale's 1933 masterpiece on down. The one exception is 2000's HOLLOW MAN which, aside from its Oscar nominated SFX is most remembered for Director Paul Verhoeven's perceived misogyny (a charge which has followed much of his career). Here, writer-director Whannell has reversed the POV and he imagines it all from the perspective of the invisible antagonist's female victim.

    Cecilia Kass (Elisabeth Moss) escapes from Adrian Griffin (Oliver Jackson-Cohen; the character name being one of the few things carried over from the Wells novel). She hides out at the home of a friend James (Aldis Hodge) and his daughter Sydney (Storm Reid). But, as he had promised/threatened - Griffin tracks her down. Structurally, the screenplay follows the spousal abuse/stalker/revenge playbook to a T. In many ways it doesn't matter if Griffin is 'visible' or not.

    What makes it work is Whannell's Direction, Moss' fine performance and the controlled creepy camerawork of Cinematographer Stefan Duscio. To their credit, the filmmakers don't overtly cheat. We see what the characters see (credit also to editor Andy Canny). The one miscalculation is Benjamin Wallfisch's loud over-the-top score which is far too overwhelming for what is essentially a low key melodrama. The special effects are relatively minimal, but well handled.

    THE INVISIBLE MAN is a moderately effective thriller. Layering on a sci-fi horror angle on what is a serious theme of domestic abuse is more questionable (indeed, a version where The Invisible Man doesn't even exist except in Cecilia's mind could easily be created with fairly minimal editing). That is something for each viewer to evaluate. Setting that aside for now, the movie works.

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