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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lorne Marshall View Post
    That's awesome, Newt! The non-fiction titles I threw in among the fiction I'm reading lately have been more of a polemical nature (so not acceptable to discuss), but I have more than a shelf's worth I've acquired over the years that I really need to dive into, like THE WEIRD WORLD OF EERIE PUBLICATIONS, THE HORROR! THE HORROR!, and FOUR COLOR FEAR.
    That EErie book is great. Started reading 42nd Street Pete's bio last night. Pretty decent so far.

  2. #192
    Pallid Hands Andrew Monroe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lorne Marshall View Post
    That's awesome, Newt! The non-fiction titles I threw in among the fiction I'm reading lately have been more of a polemical nature (so not acceptable to discuss), but I have more than a shelf's worth I've acquired over the years that I really need to dive into, like THE WEIRD WORLD OF EERIE PUBLICATIONS, THE HORROR! THE HORROR!, and FOUR COLOR FEAR.
    THE HORROR! THE HORROR is great as well. I love collections of old public domain horror comics. IDW/Yoe Comics had a series several years ago that reprinted old pre-code horror comics that was terrific as well - Haunted Horror. And yes, the first issue's cover is the same one the Misfits used for the "Die, Die My Darling" single.

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    I don't go to church. Kneeling bags my nylons.

  3. #193
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    That series plus the Weird Love series were great. I don't think they sold well cause neither appeared to last that long.

    But appears most comic fans rather read the same boring Batman/Spidey/Whatever shit then try out something that isn't cape related.

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  5. #195
    Administrator Ian Jane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Monroe View Post
    THE HORROR! THE HORROR is great as well. I love collections of old public domain horror comics. IDW/Yoe Comics had a series several years ago that reprinted old pre-code horror comics that was terrific as well - Haunted Horror. And yes, the first issue's cover is the same one the Misfits used for the "Die, Die My Darling" single.

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    I just grabbed one of these at a sale about 2 months ago, can't afford an original!

    And yeah, Mike Howlett's Eerie book is essential reading for anyone with even a passing interest in the craziness of vintage horror comics.
    Rock! Shock! Pop!

  6. #196
    I finished a few more volumes of YEAR'S BEST HORROR STORIES.

    Tales I liked in #11: my old buddy Richard Laymon's "The Grab" (made me chuckle), David Campton's "A Posthumous Bequest" (more about that in a moment), Michael Kube-McDowell's "Slippage" (rather derivative of "Shatterday" and Richard Matheson's "Disappearing Act," but still chilling), Lawrence C. Connolly's "Mrs. Halfbooger's Basement," and Thomas F. Monteleone's "Spare the Child." The last story featured in this one is Al Sarrantonio's "Pumpkin Head," and while I've always had a soft spot for it, there are at least half-a-dozen other tales from where this was sourced - the terrific Charles L. Grant-edited TERRORS - that were more deserving of a place in here (especially Alan Ryan's "Baby Blood," Chelsea Quinn Yarbro's "Disturb Not My Slumbering Fair," and Stephen King's "Survivor Type").

    Tales I liked in the somewhat weaker #12: Stephen King's "Uncle Otto's Truck" (don't think I much cared for it in his collection SKELETON CREW, but it shines brightly among most others here), Lawrence C. Connolly's "Echoes," Juleen Brantingham's "The Ventriloquist's Daughter" (although I thought it ended too abruptly), David J. Schow's "One for the Horrors" (a story about horror movies that is really kind of a sweet love story), and Al Sarrantonio's "The Man with Legs" (again he has the final offering in a collection). Honorable mention goes to Susan Casper's "Spring-Fingered Jack" (the late author herself has an intriguing backstory) and Jon Wynne-Tyson's "Mistral." I'm ambivalent about the very odd "The Flash! Kid" from Scott Bradfield.

    Now, skip this paragraph if you don't want to read about my weird OCD... Going back to the David Campton story in YBHS #11, I know this is going to sound like my insanity kicked into astronomical gear, but I noticed a very unusual placement of a phrase in his story that really caught me by surprise. At the very end of page 109 appeared the words "at the bottom of the garden." These were not at the end of the story, nor even the end of a paragraph. They were in the middle of a sentence that continued over to the next page. It's very unlikely that when the book galley was laid out, the editor/publisher could have structured it in such a way that this would happen. Yet I find it hard to believe it's a coincidence, as it's the exact name of a story (and one of my favorites) from volume #6. And the most astonishing aspect about this? The author of "At the Bottom of Garden" was (wait for it)...David Campton!

    Okay, moving on...
    VHS will never die!

  7. #197
    Also finished the last of the novels a friend gave to me, F. Paul Wilson's NIGHTWORLD. Now this is the way to portray the end times (or sort of the end times). It was kind of like "The Mist," only with a supernatural origin and about a million times the devastation (as the events depicted are worldwide). It was the sixth and final title in a series called the "Adversary Cycle" (actually, there exists a seventh one, but it was written afterward and apparently is a prequel to this one). Prior to this I had read only the first and most famous in the series, THE KEEP, yet I may eventually go back and read the titles I missed, as I really had a blast with this one. I even teared up a couple of times (yep, even my coldness occasionally thaws a bit).

    The next set of books sitting on my "to read" shelf are from a visit I made many years ago to a few used book stores in the area, inspired by my surfing a website at that time that either was or was similar to Too Much Horror Fiction (http://toomuchhorrorfiction.blogspot.com/), which Andrew and I discussed in this thread last year. From that group I'm selecting a couple of classics (since they're pretty short): John Russo's NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD and Dennis Wheatley's THE DEVIL RIDES OUT.
    VHS will never die!

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