Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30

Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #11
    Thanks a lot, folks! One publisher that (as far as I can tell) only released one issue was Alternate Publications. The comic was a black and white magazine-sized comic, ALTERNATE EXISTANCE #1. I initially thought they put out two issues, but it turned out that #2 was published by someone else. More on that later. This came out of Arkansas in 1982 and had four stories. There seems to be some connection to Bill Black’s Paragon Publications. Black provides art for the first story, “Poltergeist,” which has nothing to do with the movie or paranormal phenomena. In it, an alien steals some “power bands” and crashes on Earth. The bands are discovered by three groovy people, who then plan to use the bands to become superheroes. The end. I’m a fan of Black’s art, so this was fun. The next story is “Dr. Barnes.” In it, a man’s attempt to save his dying wife results in her death. He is sent to prison and gets released decades later. Supposedly in the next issue he would somehow become a super hero. Next up is a two-part story called “Syborge,” about a blown-up ‘Nam vet whose life is saved by being turned out to a (you guessed it) cyborg. Finally there’s “Black Cat,” which is a revival of the 1940s heroine with a splash page by Bill Black and featuring his villainess Lady Luger. Other connections to Black are an ad for BILL BLACK’S FUN COMICS #3, and the fact that the “AP” company logo on the cover looks (perhaps coincidentally) just like the AC Comics logo that Black would use when he renamed Paragon. Edit: Or maybe it was the PP logo from Paragon I’m thinking of. Sorry, this a bitch to do on my phone, and I won’t have access to a proper computer until Friday...

    Most of the art here is pretty crude, and the stories suffer from being 90% set-up/origin and not representative of the direction these strips were eventually intended to go. “Dr. Barnes” is particularly a head-scratcher, as it does not work at all as a stand-alone story, nor does it in any way tease as to the nature of the intended series.

    Further edit: If you feel that there is additional info I should be including, please let me know.
    Last edited by Marshall Crist; 05-26-2020 at 04:56 PM.

  2. #12
    LARA #1 from Crossbreed Press, 1997. This was the only mag I could find from this Fullerton, CA company, which appears to be affiliated with Ally-Winsor Comics, which I believe published only three items itself. Despite a fun cover with what appears to be a voluminously-coifed jungle girl wielding a dagger, this unfortunately turned out to not really be a comic book. Maybe halfway between a comic and a heavily-illustrated short story about the character on the cover. As such, not what I was looking for, despite some pleasant illos.

  3. #13
    HELL CITY HELL #1 (1998) appears to be the only comic published by Los Angeles’ Diablo Musica. It seems that they are/were primarily a record label, and while surprisingly the story does not reference the label’s roster or songs, the back cover promises a multi-media experience which is likely a tie-in album of various artists. I would characterize this as a variation on SIN CITY, with exotic dancers and on-stage self-immolation. Not as good as it sounds, due in part to bland (if technically competent) artwork. In color.

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Backwoods Mississippi
    Posts
    2,262
    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall Crist View Post
    I made a list of about 200 small comic book publishers (focusing largely on ones that put out “bad girl art” in the ‘90s) then set about acquiring the entire back catalogs of the ones who put out the fewest numbers of individual issues. I am still acquiring them, but began by reading the comics of the companies who only put out one single comic before folding, then moved on to the ones who only released two issues, etc. A lot of dreck, but some pleasant surprises. I can elaborate if I get the feeling that anyone cares, but that would surprise me.
    I got in a bunch of 90s badgirl comics last year. Never tried reading any of them so far.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Newt Cox View Post
    I got in a bunch of 90s badgirl comics last year. Never tried reading any of them so far.
    It’s nice having surplus reading material for a rainy day or worldwide pandemic.

  6. #16
    Surprise! Three years later (1985) and suddenly ALTERNATE EXISTANCE #2 appears. This time it’s a standard-sized color comic published by Dragonmaster Comics out of Atwater, CA. It starts off with a 15-page Poltergeist story, the first four pages of which are recap. Perfectly understandable given the gap between issues and the obscurity of the previous one. The art here is not as fluid as the earlier installment. Then there’s a 10-page story about a new character, a lady spy named Janitt Targitt. I like to think she’s related to Atlas Comics’ ‘70s character Targitt, but there is no evidence to suggest this. Things end on a lame note with a colorized reprint of the enigmatic Dr. Barnes story from issue#1. There is an ad for a third issue, but neither it nor any additional comics from Dragonmaster seem to have materialized. I could have done with more of this.

  7. #17
    Pallid Hands Andrew Monroe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    This Godforsaken Outpost
    Posts
    4,696
    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall Crist View Post
    HELL CITY HELL #1 (1998) appears to be the only comic published by Los Angeles’ Diablo Musica. It seems that they are/were primarily a record label, and while surprisingly the story does not reference the label’s roster or songs, the back cover promises a multi-media experience which is likely a tie-in album of various artists. I would characterize this as a variation on SIN CITY, with exotic dancers and on-stage self-immolation. Not as good as it sounds, due in part to bland (if technically competent) artwork. In color.
    I wonder if the Supersuckers were on that V/A album (assuming it came out). They had a song called "Hell City Hell" on their first album - which was on Sub Pop.

    edit - actually not their first album - The Songs All Sound The Same is - but first for Sub Pop.
    Last edited by Andrew Monroe; 05-26-2020 at 07:32 PM.
    I don't go to church. Kneeling bags my nylons.

  8. #18
    There is an ad in the comic for a Supersuckers product on Interscope that appears to be titled 1999 666. Hard to tell because of the way the text is laid out. Acts listed as featured on the HELL CITY HELL album (if that is indeed what it is) are Puff Daddy & The Family, Fastball, Supersuckers, and Samiam.

  9. #19
    Hey, another one-off that I didn’t particularly like is TRIBAL FORCE #1 (1996), the sole effort from Costa Mesa, CA’s Mystic Comics. It pits pissed-off, super-powered Native American beings against the US military. Great concept, but I was not drawn in. Once again, this suffers from unrealized ambitions which would have extend beyond the first issue, which is exposition-heavy. In color.
    Last edited by Marshall Crist; 05-26-2020 at 11:24 PM.

  10. #20
    I oftentimes select a couple of titles off a bookcase containing books I picked up years ago. Right now I'm going through the 2002 anthology SHIVERS (edited by Richard Chizmar) and Richard Laymon's RESURRECTION DREAMS (1988). I have a lot of titles I've picked up in the last couple of years that I should get to soon, like DON'T DISTURB THE DEAD (about the Bollywood brothers who specialized in horror), which I first read about in this forum.

    Thanks for starting this thread, Newt. It will nudge me to crack open books more often than I have lately.
    VHS will never die!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •