Page 10 of 60 FirstFirst ... 8910111220 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 593

Thread: The Film Noir Thread! Gats, dames, and cheap hooch welcome.

  1. #91
    Senior Member Apronikoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    783
    Watched BORN TO KILL last night. It had been a long time since I'd seen a really classic noir, so that was a real treat. A real nasty, misanthropic gem. I particularly liked the seen where Trevor and Tierney's characters are clearly getting turned on talking about the murder they witnessed/committed respectively.

  2. #92
    Pallid Hands Andrew Monroe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    This Godforsaken Outpost
    Posts
    4,030
    Agreed, that's a good one. Tierney is a genunely frightening guy in this film, and Trevor is a sociopath herself. I love Claire Trevor, a great actress who's probably forgotten by a lot of people today.
    I don't go to church. Kneeling bags my nylons.

  3. #93
    Senior Member Apronikoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    783
    I decided to just work my way through the second WB film noir box. So yesterday was:

    CROSSFIRE -- Confession time, I REALLY hate message movies, especially from the 40's/50's. Not that I have a problem with movies that have a social conscience or that address relevant issues. But to me there are few things as ponderous and annoying as a movie putting the brakes on the plot so that a character can deliver a ten-minute monologue on whatever social issue is on the scriptwriter's mind. Show, don't tell boys. And well, Crossfire is just a message movie lit like a film noir. Hell, Dymtryk literally described the murder mystery plot as just being the sugar to help the audience swallow their medicine. Frankly, I find that kind of talk about the movies insulting and pedantic.

    Still, if you are able to mentally snip out the monologue about why hating jews is bad, m'kay, the rest of the movie is pretty good and has at least one great reason to see it. And that reason's name is Gloria Grahame. She's only in two scenes but her wounded, petulant dancer just lights up the screen. Actually the cast is pretty good all around. Mitchum is Mitchum, although he doesn't have a lot to work with here. Robert Ryan is pretty good at the detective. I kept thinking that his role seemed like it would fit in an Argento movie (one of my favorite aspects of Argento's giallos is the way that he finds little idiosyncratic details for his secondary characters) -- with the pipe hanging limply from his mouth and his sprawling, halfway lying down posture in his chair.

  4. #94
    Pallid Hands Andrew Monroe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    This Godforsaken Outpost
    Posts
    4,030
    Couldn't disagree more about CROSSFIRE, I think it's a fine noir first and foremost - it's a dark film. With Dymtryk at the helm there's no way it couldn't work as noir. And it actually works as a message picture far more effectively than the better known GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT, which it pre-dates. "The snakes are loose." Do agree that Gloria Grahame is fantastic, as usual. I reckon no one played the "woman of ill repute" in these films better. A terrific, still underrated actress.

    My favorite from that set is THE NARROW MARGIN. Least is CLASH BY NIGHT.
    I don't go to church. Kneeling bags my nylons.

  5. #95
    Senior Member Apronikoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    783
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Monroe View Post
    My favorite from that set is THE NARROW MARGIN. Least is CLASH BY NIGHT.
    Well, that seemed good enough reason to queue up THE NARROW MARGIN next, so I watched it tonight. I LOVED it. Granted, I have a thing for train movies, so I was predisposed to like this one. But it's just a perfectly paced thriller with crackerjack pulp dialogue and tremendous use of the geometry of the train/windows/reflections throughout.

    A real treat.

  6. #96
    You'll notice A NARROW MARGIN has no music.

    No music.

    There's some radio and a record player, but no score.

    Instead, the rhythm of the rails and the clackity-clack of the train become a kind of seductive sound.

    The absence of a score allows ambient sound to create a sense of immediacy and spontaneity.
    In contrast, artificial music would ruin it.

    Don't you agree, Apronikoff.
    Last edited by Richard--W; 11-10-2012 at 09:52 AM.
    "I've been to college, but I can still speak English when business demands it."
    - Raymond Chandler, 1939.

  7. #97
    Senior Member Robin Bougie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Vancouver BC, Canada
    Posts
    950
    I seriously didn't even notice that when I saw it. Crazy.

  8. #98
    Senior Member Apronikoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    783
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard--W View Post
    Instead, the rhythm of the rails and the clackity-clack of the train become a kind of seductive sound.

    The absence of a score allows ambient sound to create a sense of immediacy and spontaneity.
    In contrast, artificial music would ruin it.

    Don't you agree, Apronikoff.
    Absolutely. For me, the best moment on the soundtrack was when Marie Windsor was filing her nails nervously in her room and the film cuts to an external shot of the train. The nail-filing sound stays on the soundtrack for a few moments in perfect time with the clacking of the train. A very musical moment in itself, and immediately evokes the idea that the train is the backbeat of the story.

  9. #99
    Administrator Ian Jane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Queens, NYC
    Posts
    44,548
    The Window and Stranger On The Third Floor are screening as part of Lustig's series at NYC's Anthology Film Archives.

    http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/fil...#showing-40065
    Rock! Shock! Pop!

  10. #100
    Pallid Hands Andrew Monroe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    This Godforsaken Outpost
    Posts
    4,030
    Saw a couple items of interest at the BAN forums - Film Chest is releasing the Andre de Toth noir PITFALL (dvd only) on November 20. Only 10 bucks at Amazon and it will probably be an upgrade from the Synergy bootleg I got not long ago. This is that Dick Powell, Lizabeth Scott, Raymond Burr noir and it's really good. I'll take a bite and see if it's better. Also, Fox Cinema Archives apparently have some noirs in the pipeline for the end of the month, among them the long-awaited THE BRASHER DOUBLOON (Chandler) and INFERNO (Robert Ryan and Rhonda Fleming). No Amazon listings for these yet though. Never seen INFERNO but it sounds quite interesting - was originally in 3-D.
    I don't go to church. Kneeling bags my nylons.

Similar Threads

  1. The Cheap Trashy Multipacks Thread!
    By Ian Jane in forum Exploitation And Smut
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 11-11-2014, 03:08 PM
  2. the ANTHONY MANN Film Noir poll
    By Richard--W in forum General Cinema
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-03-2014, 01:23 PM
  3. is DEATH WISH a film noir / neo-noir?
    By Richard--W in forum General Cinema
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-24-2013, 11:53 AM
  4. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 08-21-2013, 09:28 PM
  5. Film Noir photo shoot
    By Dom D in forum Photography
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-23-2011, 08:39 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •