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  1. #1
    Administrator Ian Jane's Avatar
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    Wolf Creek

    OK, so the original didn't reinvent the wheel or anything but I liked it. It had a nasty streak to it that was pretty effective but wasn't without moments of effective black humor. Kind of a cool Australian slant on what would otherwise be maybe a fairly typical American backwoods slasher/hillbilly horror movie.

    It did well enough that a sequel is in the works. And I'm ok with that.

    An Australian newspaper called The Age has an article up on the movie from earlier this month (thanks to Bloody Disgusting for posting the link).

    Greg McLean is directing, Mick Taylor is back.

    "Mclean believes the first film resonated so much because there is a little bit of Mick Taylor in all of us, and the opportunity to explore that a little more was what drew him back.

    ''I'm not really interested in gore and blood and stuff,'' says the Melbourne-based director, whose second feature, the $25 million crocodile film Rogue, might suggest otherwise. ''I'm interested in why the character connected with Australian audiences. It's not about being a horror film - it's because Mick is about something else, something deep and dark in the Australian psyche.''

    He might be right, but it is also likely that part of what made Wolf Creek so successful was that nobody expected such an accomplished piece of genre filmmaking from a first-time director. This time around, though, Mclean knows he is dealing not just with a much bigger budget - about $7 million - but also with a great weight of anticipation from the fans."

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  2. #2
    And it only took them about a decade for a sequel? Okay. I thought the original was good but it's tedious to sit through once you know who the killer is and it's all about waiting for the chaos to get into action. Good film just not very re-watchable.
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  3. #3
    Administrator Ian Jane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex K. View Post
    And it only took them about a decade for a sequel? Okay. I thought the original was good but it's tedious to sit through once you know who the killer is and it's all about waiting for the chaos to get into action.
    I think that applies to at least 50% of horror movies though. But in all fairness, I haven't rewatched it since I got the DVD years ago.

    And Dom... so what you're saying is that the secret to box office success in Australia is nasty gore? That doesn't sound so different from the US!
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jane View Post
    And Dom... so what you're saying is that the secret to box office success in Australia is nasty gore? That doesn't sound so different from the US!
    I think it was more specific than that. I don't know what the reaction to the film was over there but it was our Texas Chainsaw Massacre. The nastiest movie of all time... apparently. I am kind of surprised it's taken this long for a sequel though.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Apronikoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dom D View Post
    I think it was more specific than that. I don't know what the reaction to the film was over there but it was our Texas Chainsaw Massacre. The nastiest movie of all time... apparently. I am kind of surprised it's taken this long for a sequel though.
    It's interesting you make that analogy. Although I live in Ohio for work now, I'm a Texan (and always will be lol). For me (and most of the TX horror fans I've spoken to) Chainsaw has special place, not just because it's "nasty" but because there's something that resonates as "real" about it if you've spent much time in Texas. So when I read McClean's comment the first time, Chainsaw popped immediately to mind when I saw that phrase "something deep and dark in the Australian psyche."

    Anyway, I know that has no bearing on why Wolf Creek (which I still haven't gotten around to seeing) was popular. Just thought it was interesting...

  6. #6
    Possibly. There may be a difference here in that the Texas in Texas Chainsaw is relatable to Texans (I'm just assuming, never having been) but Wolf Creek exists in the desert. Most of Australia is desert but I've never actually seen it. That wouldn't be too unusual. This is one of the most urbanised countries on earth and the desert depicted in Aussie movies is as much a fairytale to us as it is to foriegners. Same goes for that kind of character. He's part of the Australian legend but almost all the people I know spend their days in suits.

    Now the Matrix looks recognisable as the Australia I know.
    Last edited by Dom D; 02-27-2013 at 08:54 PM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jane View Post
    I think that applies to at least 50% of horror movies though. But in all fairness, I haven't rewatched it since I got the DVD years ago.

    And Dom... so what you're saying is that the secret to box office success in Australia is nasty gore? That doesn't sound so different from the US!
    I dunno, I could watch Black Christmas whenever for the most part. I guess that's because it doesn't take as long for the carnage to begin.

    I find it admirable to take your time and build your characters and suspense, but you have to think about re-watch-ability.
    "Birds born in a cage think flying is an illness."

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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jane View Post
    "Mclean believes the first film resonated so much because there is a little bit of Mick Taylor in all of us, and the opportunity to explore that a little more was what drew him back.

    ''I'm not really interested in gore and blood and stuff,'' says the Melbourne-based director, whose second feature, the $25 million crocodile film Rogue, might suggest otherwise. ''I'm interested in why the character connected with Australian audiences. It's not about being a horror film - it's because Mick is about something else, something deep and dark in the Australian psyche.''
    Didn't like the film much but just needed to say what a load of bollocks I think the above is. The film was a hit locally because it got mainstream distribution and was the most violent and unpleasant film in memory to do so. Audiences round these parts thought it was the most disgusting film ever made and thus a hit.

  9. #9
    I dont think i ever caught WOLF CREEK.....Worth a watch?

  10. #10
    Administrator Ian Jane's Avatar
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    I enjoyed it as a decent backwoods slasher. It's not the most original film in the world but I'd say if you like that type of thing that it's at least worth a rental.
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