Page 59 of 60 FirstFirst ... 94957585960 LastLast
Results 581 to 590 of 596

Thread: What Asian Films Have You Been Watching Recently?

  1. #581
    I decided to re-watch Toru Murakawa's NEW YORK COP and it wasn't as bad as I recall the first time I saw it years ago. Still pretty cheesy in parts & Toru Nakamura is a fish out of water considering his extremely limited English. It strains all credulity that Nakamura would be working undercover as an NYPD cop but once you can get past that, his on screen presence isn't too bad. He has some decent fight scenes and seems to handle himself ok doing his own stunt work. It's just cringe though when he starts to curse in English and do his "Terminator" routine at the end. The really bad acting in this flick came from Steve McQueen's son, Chad. He was just horrible! Imagine a California beach bum trying to be a hard ass New York Rican. Overall not a bad gig for Nakamura. He was able to come Stateside and have a love making scene with a couple of beautiful actresses in Mira Sorvino and Virginia Madsen because right after this flick, he made a film starring Virginia Madsen where he played some tatted up Yakuza gangster and got to bed her as well. That flick was more entertaining especially Virginia doing the whole Ms. 45 thing to get vengeance.

    "only the simplest can accommodate the most complex"

  2. #582
    I caught Lee Jeong-beom's Netflix Korean thriller, JO PIL HO: THE DAWNING RAGE. I prefer the simpler BAD POLICE original title but I guess it didn't have the zing of the current one. Regardless of the name, it's a decent enough flick with a refreshing gritty vibe which is lacking the over stylized and glossy crime flicks that are coming out of Korea these days. Frankly, I was really hoping for a Korean BAD LIEUTENANT but I knew my hopes were dashed about 30 minutes in. It ended up being more of a mystery murder/crime thriller in the first act with the latter half turning into a revenge yarn mixed with the current trend of critiquing the rich & powerful chaebols and conglomerates that have a large influence on every aspect of Korean society and culture. The Sewol Ferry tragedy also figures prominently in the storyline. There is quite a bit of broad humor in the mix, so the material isn't too dark and dreary. To that end, it was still a bit disappointing that it ended up a more conventional film than I had initially imagined because Lee Sun-kyun would've made an excellent Korean Harvey Keitel if the screenplay would've let his inner sleaze come out & let him be this completely nihilistic character. He does play a corrupt detective on the take and only looking to line his own pockets at others' expense but he still ultimately possesses a moral compass. Nonetheless, Lee Sun-kyun continues to show that he is one of Korea's most versatile actors and I've enjoyed him in everything from rom-coms to black comedies to grittier dramas like this film. Overall, a decent watch but not must see.



    Last edited by 47lab; 05-25-2019 at 12:51 AM. Reason: added second trailer
    "only the simplest can accommodate the most complex"

  3. #583
    The Mole Song: Hong Kong Capriccio (2016) 7.5/10
    Reiji is back infiltrating the yakuza, here battling it out with the triad to save the boss's daughter while at the same time someone is trying to sniff him out (as the mole/informant he is).
    To me this turns out the be one of few "return to classic Miike" that some of us crave. Since Sukiyaki Western Django Miike is overall not as exciting as before, with exceptions like this
    the previous Mole Song, Lesson of Evil and some other titles to a lesser degree.

    Perhaps the weak bits are the CGI loaded opening and the somewhat dragged out ending, but otherwise loaded with Miikes unique over-the-top unexpected traits that never fails to amuse me.
    How about a shitstained plunger to the face?


  4. #584
    Senior Member Takuma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    1,747
    Quote Originally Posted by 47lab View Post
    The really bad acting in this flick came from Steve McQueen's son, Chad. He was just horrible! Imagine a California beach bum trying to be a hard ass New York Rican.
    It's been a decade since I saw the film, but I wrote in my review that he's the film's best actor!

  5. #585
    Quote Originally Posted by ropo1 View Post
    The Mole Song: Hong Kong Capriccio (2016) 7.5/10
    Reiji is back infiltrating the yakuza, here battling it out with the triad to save the boss's daughter while at the same time someone is trying to sniff him out (as the mole/informant he is).
    To me this turns out the be one of few "return to classic Miike" that some of us crave. Since Sukiyaki Western Django Miike is overall not as exciting as before, with exceptions like this
    the previous Mole Song, Lesson of Evil and some other titles to a lesser degree.

    Perhaps the weak bits are the CGI loaded opening and the somewhat dragged out ending, but otherwise loaded with Miikes unique over-the-top unexpected traits that never fails to amuse me.
    How about a shitstained plunger to the face?

    https://i.postimg.cc/FRGKfK9k/vlcsna...h30m46s778.png
    I downloaded this a long time ago but it looked like total shit with the CGI tiger that I never watched it. I still kept the file though. Based on your review, I'll give it a go later.

    Anyway, went to the movies over the Memorial Day holiday and checked out Jung Da-won's comedy action drama, MISS AND MRS. COPS. A stupid title with the literal romanization being GIRL COPS which is much better. According to kmdb this is the director's second film but really his first with any budget and backing. It was not bad at all. The first half was actually hilarious and the audience was roaring with laughter especially at the comedic hijinks between the two leads who are sisters in law with a weird family dynamic and backstory. There is a recurring joke about Mi-ran's moron husband but that was pretty stale after the first couple of attempts. The true laughs and entertaining scenes were between the aforementioned sisters in law and their computer hacker genius co-worker played by Sooyoung of SNSD Kpop fame. I felt she stole the show as she was just fantastic every time she was onscreen. Unfortunately, after the hilarious initial build up towards the confrontation with the baddies, it goes off the rails and veers into standard action territory with the usual cat and mouse games, car chases, explosions, etc. If you blink, you'll miss a cameo by Ha Jung-woo as a clerk at a seedy hotel. The ensuing scene between Lee Sung-kyung and a reformed druggie perp who is now into taking upskirt vids of unsuspecting women is one of the funniest scenes in the entire flick. Speaking of upskirt vids, this movie also has a rather heavy handed social message about 'molka' (spy cam) and revenge porn which has become part of larger social issue in South Korea of late. Certainly an important message the director wants to get across but I enjoyed the light hearted office antics and the gals trying to investigate a case on the sly while tricking their overbearing superior the most. That's what made me give this film an overall recommendation with a few caveats that I spelled out earlier.



    Last edited by 47lab; 05-28-2019 at 07:34 PM.
    "only the simplest can accommodate the most complex"

  6. #586
    Quote Originally Posted by mjeon View Post
    Somehow I missed 47 Lab's review of Moon Warriors, which could have spared me a great deal of disappointment. How so many talented people could come together and produce something as juvenile and treacly and unoriginal as this is a question future film historians might well debate. As for the USP, every time that big fish swam into the viewfinder, my heart sank.

    Presumably this was originally a handsome spectacle, but the colors in the Universe disc are washed out.
    Hey since you're such a fan of this awesome movie from Sammo. A blu ray came out about a week ago. I'm sure the colors are much better in this release.

    "only the simplest can accommodate the most complex"

  7. #587
    Senior Member Takuma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    1,747
    Kinnosuke Nakamura x 3

    Yatappe of Seki (関の弥太っぺ) (Japan, 1963) [DVD] - 3/5
    Classic, often filmed matatabi tale of a young wanderer who saves a little girl whose pickpocket father is killed. The second half of the film picks up 10 years later when the protagonist has grown into a full-fledged yakuza wanderer and once again crosses paths with the same girl (now a woman). This Toei version pairs Kinnosuke Nakamura with soon-to-be ninkyo yakuza master Kosaku Yamashita. It's certainly a good film, but perhaps not as much my cup of green tea as Yamashita's “modern ninkyo” films. In this film as well I enjoyed the more yakuza oriented 2nd half the best (it's also beautifully filmed, especially the ending where Nakamura walks into a fight that is to begin after the film's end - the whole scene is just magnificently put together).



    The Secret of the Urn (丹下左膳 飛燕居合斬り) (Japan, 1966) [35mm] - 2.5/5
    Hideo Gosha's first Toei picture is below par in his otherwise gripping, visionary 60s filmography. He was reportedly brought in to breathe some final life into the out-of-fashion samurai film genre before Toei would pull off the cord and essentially cease samurai productions. He must have been given a very mediocre script to helm, in this case a new one-armed, one eyed swordsman Tange Sazen tale (the character dates back to the 1920s when he first appeared on screen; there were several Lady Sazen variations as well). Jidai geki legend Kinnosuke Nakamura stars; also one of his last samurai films before Toei brought the genre back big time with '78's Shogun's Samurai. Not bad, with plenty of action and some energetic touches, but nothing special either, though I'm unable to compare to the two dozen earlier Tange Sazen film as I haven't seen any of them.

    Tokijiro Kutsukake: Lone Yakuza (沓掛時次郎 遊侠一匹) (Japan, 1966) [35mm] - 3.5/5
    Tai Kato's adaptation of Shin Hasegawa’s often filmed book (at least 7 earlier films + TV versions). Kinnosuke Nakamura is a yakuza wanderer who is assigned to kill a man whose wife and son he had helped earlier. It’s basically ninkyo yakuza film with a matatabi touch and a bit of samurai film flavor. Masahiro Kakefuda and Naoyuki Suzuki's script is reportedly an improvement over the source material in some ways, adding more depth. Yet, it’s also one of Kato's more old fashioned emotional pictures, which is more to my liking anyway than the cold minimalism found in some of his other films. A classy story drawn in vivid colors, easily recommended.




    Hisayasu Sato x 3

    Survey Map of a Paradise Lost (ハードフォーカス 盗聴<ぬすみぎき) (Japan, 1988) - 2.5/5
    A male reporter meets an underage call girl whose client is into videotaping all the perverted, often violent acts. Sex, VHS tapes, AIDS, slight cyberpunk vibe, and a speech about how beautiful idol Yukiko Okada looked when she lied in a pool of blood on the street after her suicide (1986). You wish the film was longer; the carnal action takes half of the otherwise interesting 64 minutes, though it must be said the twisted sex scenes are surprisingly watchable, and so is the cute-as-hell Rio Yanagawa.

    Love - Zero = Infinity (いやらしい人妻 濡れる) (Japan, 1994) - 3.5/5
    Hisayasu Sato's Shinjuku: a lonely protagonist observing strangers on the streets, a young couple injecting each other's blood into their veins, reports of a vampire killer on the loose, AIDS spreading via medical blood products. Slightly underwritten and falling short for its potential, this is still a fascinating existential pink film with a haunting score and great 90s aura.



    Rafureshia (すけべ妻 夫の留守に) (Japan, 1995) – 1.5/5
    Horny mother, neglected wife and brainwashed-by-sugar-daddy girl go the sexual liberation route in bizarre pink fashion. Too light and comedic, void of the sharp and nihilist socio-philosophical analysis of better Hisayasu Sato films. It's delightfully light on sex, though.


    Others x 3

    Shaolin Wooden Men (Hong Kong, 1976) [Netflix] - 3.5/5
    Jackie is a mute Shaolin student in a straight-faced Lo Wei era film that starts out dull but gets progressively better. The fights are good, Shaolin's wooden men rock, there are crazy color filters and all the kung fu clichés are presented in a nostalgic, enjoyable form. And what can be said about the ending (spoiler: Jackie's not mute, he was just pretending for 15 years)... hah, awesome!



    The Yellow Sea (South Korea, 2010) [Netflix] - 3/5
    Gripping, but uneven thriller told in an overly complicated fashion. It works better when the politics are put aside and the focus is on the sad protagonist, a man from a Chinese / North Korean border town sent to Seoul to kill a man. There are two major chase sequences, the first one of which is brilliant but the second one a shaky cam mess. The closing scene is great, but the ultra-violent last hour is otherwise too over-the-top to be taken seriously. Feels much like director Na Hong-jin ‘s first film, The Chaser.

    Moebius (South-Korea, 2013) [Netflix] - 2/5
    Kim Ki-duk's film about lost dicks. Shocking, but repetitive with one dimensional characters. The film had quite a bit of censorship trouble in Asian countries, including Japan where the film was cut to shreds. The film could only secure an 18 rating in Japan after 5 minutes of censorship cuts to remove "child pornography" (the actor playing “the son” was 15 at the time of filming). Western censors, BBFC included, had no similar objections. How ironic.

  8. #588
    Shaolin Wooden Men is one of my all-time faves!

  9. #589
    Quote Originally Posted by 47lab View Post
    I downloaded this a long time ago but it looked like total shit with the CGI tiger that I never watched it. I still kept the file though. Based on your review, I'll give it a go later.
    Hopefully won't dissapoint! Kinda forget to add how funny i think it is with this kind of humour when the maincharacter assumes something totally offbeat as inner dialogue and then something even more offbeat, might, happen.
    The anime Golden Boy sometimes came to mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by Takuma View Post
    Love - Zero = Infinity (いやらしい人妻 濡れる) (Japan, 1994) - 3.5/5
    Hisayasu Sato's Shinjuku: a lonely protagonist observing strangers on the streets, a young couple injecting each other's blood into their veins, reports of a vampire killer on the loose, AIDS spreading via medical blood products. Slightly underwritten and falling short for its potential, this is still a fascinating existential pink film with a haunting score and great 90s aura.
    Maybe this is the Sato film i should try out, sounds interesting. Seen ~10-15 of his films but never been to impressed (keep coming back for more though, so something is there).

  10. #590
    47Lab: "Hey since you're such a fan of this awesome movie from Sammo. A blu ray came out about a week ago. I'm sure the colors are much better in this release."

    You saved me some money. I had forgotten the name of the film and on the basis of the cover would probably have stupidly bought it again. Look at that cover. It sure looks like a great movie, doesn't it? They don't want you to know it's the Shamu movie. Bastards.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 08-12-2015, 04:55 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-24-2014, 07:05 AM
  3. Films that make you want to take a shower after watching it
    By Wllm Clys in forum Exploitation And Smut
    Replies: 75
    Last Post: 07-22-2013, 11:30 PM
  4. Asian revenge films
    By Quot in forum Asian
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-29-2012, 05:06 PM
  5. I love coincidences in watching films
    By The Silly Swede in forum General Cinema
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-07-2011, 12:55 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •