• Prometheus: Life And Death #2



    Prometheus: Life And Death #2
    Released by: Dark Horse Comics
    Released on: July 13th, 2015.
    Written by: Dan Abnett
    Illustrated by: Andrea Mutti
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    The second issue of the second run of Dark Horse Comics’ AVP Life And Death series of four issue storylines, Prometheus: Life And Death, continues, picking up where the Predator: Life And Death storyline ended and where the first issue left off. A text page advises us:

    “This story takes place approximately forty-three years after the events in the motion picture Aliens (and just over a year after the events in the Fire and Stone story cycle). After a pitched battle with a group of Predators on the planet Tartarus (LV-797), a squad of Colonial Marines
    and some survivors from an ill-fated Seegson Corp. mission managed to secure—and launch—a mysterious horseshoe-shaped alien spaceship. As the rest of the marine company returned to their own ship to escort the captured alien vessel back to Earth, the humanoid pilot of the alien vessel awoke from stasis. Helpless against the pilot, the humans onboard hid within the bowels of the ship while its pilot changed course—leaving the marine vessel behind and heading
    for a remote world known as LV-223 . . .”

    The first issue ended with a pretty serious cliffhanger – there are Marines on their own ship and then there are Marines on that “mysterious horseshoe-shaped alien spaceship” – it’s the ones on the alien ship that we’re now worrying about. When a firefight accidently opened up some sort of cryo chamber, something dangerous emerged. When this issue begins, we see the ship land and we see that thing walk out of it onto the surface of an unnamed planet. Some humans observe, the comment on the presence of ‘a Goddamn Engineer’ – and then they notice a bunch of people following it. Marines. And they’re clearly running for cover.

    Singer, Jhalil, Roth, Melville, Rucker, Freebody, Humble and company managed to survive six days on the ship with that ‘thing’ and now they intend to hide, to stay far, far away from it and hopefully find a way home. Unfortunately they have no idea where they’ve just landed. They’re also sorely lacking in food, water and shelter and shockingly low on ammo. Roth figures Paget has to have sent a ship after them, so he wants Singer to set up a distress beacon – but what is that thing hears it? It’ll lead him right to them.

    Melville and Singer, scientists not Marines, really want to examine the pyramid that is inside the ship. They want to learn more about this ‘Space God’ and its origins. The Marines search for food but find only toxic plant and animal life… and some mysterious black goop that seems organic in nature – but Singer’s tests show that it has been genetically engineered. Their theorizing is cut short when the scanner shows that something is in the woods nearby. They take up arms but suffer casualties when an alien shows up, quickly finding themselves outnumbered.

    And then the two people that were watching them, the man and the woman, show up… and they’ve brought backup.

    Well, this second issue definitely takes things in some unexpected directions, but it works. The story digs itself into the established continuity and holds on tight, pulling from a few different AVP storylines here and actually making good sense of out those sometimes rather complex and fairly epic tales. Dan Abnett writes a mean yarn here, providing plenty of suspense and some rock solid action and horror but also laying the ground work for a few more plot lines that are sure to follow. And by tying things into some of the past thread, it makes for a pretty satisfying read. This is going to get interesting next issue, that’s for sure. Andrea Mutti’s artwork is good. She draws the humans well and provides plenty of background detail on the unnamed planet where all the action takes place. The aliens are nicely illustrated as well, while Rain Beredo’s coloring and David Palumbo’s awesome cover painting are also very strong and worth mentioning.